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Perspectives Long
Perspectives on WFSU Public Media
Thursdays, 11 am ET - Noon ET

Perspectives is also available as a podcast.

Join WFSU Public Media and host Tom Flanigan for the live, listener call-in program Perspectives. It's the perfect forum to discuss the issues that concern listeners in the North Florida and South Georgia regions. Tom invites local guests for a one-hour discussion about timely social topics while encouraging listener comments and questions.

WFSU relies on listener contributions to make this program an interactive platform for community discussion. There are several ways to get in touch with us to share your questions and comments.

By phone: 850-414-1234
E-mail: perspectives@wfsu.org
Twitter: @wfsuperspective

Latest Episodes
  • Historical accounts say there were four lynching deaths in Leon County between 1897 and 1937. Those tragedies will be formally recognized with the placement of a memorial near the site of the old county jail on Saturday, July 17. To talk about that and the hope that awareness will lead to deeper understanding and empathy are Remembrance Project members: Byron Greene, Blan Teagle, Maxine Jones, Brant Copeland and Penny Young.
  • Two years ago, Leon County's annual Veterans' Stand Downs had been so effective in reducing the incidence of veteran homelessness that only about 100 people took advantage of the service showcase. But the intervening pandemic has meant an increase in both the number of homeless veterans and incidence of those at risk of homelessness. So the Veterans' Stand Down returns this year on August 6 and 7 at the Al Lawson Center on the FAMU Campus. To talk about it are: Event Coordinator Bill Eichhofer and Stand Down Founder Col. Washington Sanchez.
  • Too many young people have no father with which to celebrate Fathers' Day. But in the Capital City area, there are multiple organizations that work to provide positive fatherly role models for kids. To talk about it are: Jack Levine, award-winning Florida children's advocate and founder of the 4Generations Institute; and Leon County Sheriff Walt McNeil.
  • As with most everything else, the pandemic took its toll on the construction industry. But even as COVID recedes, supply chain interruptions, rising construction material prices and worker shortages are still afflicting the industry. To talk it over are: Jay Bostwick with Tallahassee's Sperry & Assoc. who chairs the Association of Builders and Contractors of North Florida; and Kim Anderson with Pensacola's Comfort Systems USA, the association's vice-chair.
  • In a surprising number of cases involving non-violent criminal convictions and even simple arrests without conviction, court-ordered record sealing and expungement can help prevent a lifetime of trouble when it comes to getting a job or securing a place to live. Now the Legal Aid Foundation of Tallahassee is hosting a number of community seminars to explain the process and who might be eligible to avail themselves of it. To talk about it are: Carrie Litherland, executive director of the Legal Aid Foundation; Second Judicial District Public Defender Jessica Yeary; and Tallahassee Attorney Ginny Dailey.
  • Tallahassee's Wanderlust Theatre is out to capture the amazing heritage of the Frenchtown community with a multi-media presentation featuring some of the area's most creative voices. To talk about it are: The Theatre's leading light, Laura Hope London; Nationally celebrated singer, songwriter and music producer Royce Lovett; Keith Rogers, founder of Black on Black Rhyme; and Poet Jakaila Scaife.
  • The incidence of Alzheimer's and other cognitive disorders is increasing as the population ages. The Alzheimer's Project helps those impacted by these diseases in Tallahassee and surrounding North Florida communities. To talk about it are: Executive Director John Trombetta; Rob Wicker, Project board member and long-time caregiver for his mother; and Brian Delaney, another Project board member whose father had Alzheimer's.
  • Despite much harsher penalties in recent years, people still operate motor vehicles while impaired by alcohol or drugs. To talk about the potentially deadly consequences are: Sharon Hall, MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) Florida program manager; Claudia Machado, MADD program specialist for Northwest Florida; and Tallahassee Police Officer Henni Hamby.
  • A felony conviction does not have to carry a life sentence. There are many programs and partnerships in the Capital City area that help those who have served their time find employment, housing and a positive purpose in life after lockup. To talk about it are: Rebecca Kelly-Manders, founder of the REfire Culinary Program for former offenders; Larry Bourdeau, director of re-entry programs for the Leon County Sheriff's Department; Don Papania, owner of Carver's Discount Dry Cleaners; Anne Meisenzahl and Rashad Simon, both board members of the Big Bend AFTER Re-entry Coalition; and Freddie Rouse from Disc Village.
  • New generations of American military veterans, beginning in the Vietnam era, have seemed less and less inclined to join traditional veterans service organizations, such as the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and AMVETS. Yet these groups still provide many kinds of services and resources that aren't really available anywhere else. To talk about the efforts of those groups to educate and recruit these veterans in North Florida are: Frank Roycraft, affiliated with Tallahassee VFW Post 3308; Gordon Lightfoot, who's a member of the Marine Corps League and AMVETS; Tom Carney with the Air Force Association; Jim Burke, Marine Corps League and head of the Young Marines organization; and Stuart Scott, a USAF veteran who is the district commander of the American Legion.