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This the catch-all for programs produced in-house.

  • Capital Report (large)
    WFSU Public Media
    On tonight’s program: The Florida House and Senate are still miles apart on a plan to revamp school choice. Opponents say the ultimate plan needs to include more oversight of private schools; Once again, the Florida Legislature considers reforming the state’s alimony laws; A GOP-backed proposal to restrict transgender women and girls from playing on female teams may die in the Florida Senate; Lawmakers are looking into a program that’s supposed to provide support for children who suffered neurological or spinal cord injuries at birth; And two and a half years after the fact, the aftermath of Hurricane Michael is still the subject of analysis, and how events of the past year made the struggle of victims worse.
  • On tonight’s program: The Florida House and Senate are still miles apart on a plan to revamp school choice. Opponents say the ultimate plan needs to include more oversight of private schools; Once again, the Florida Legislature considers reforming the state’s alimony laws; A GOP-backed proposal to restrict transgender women and girls from playing on female teams may die in the Florida Senate; Lawmakers are looking into a program that’s supposed to provide support for children who suffered neurological or spinal cord injuries at birth; And two and a half years after the fact, the aftermath of Hurricane Michael is still the subject of analysis, and how events of the past year made the struggle of victims worse.
  • On tonight’s program: Violent protests in Florida are now even more against the law than they used to be; Even before Governor DeSantis signed the protest bill, just the threat of it was giving this demonstrator in St. Petersburg pause; Lawmakers are working to find middle ground on spending plans including an initiative that would extend Medicaid coverage for new mothers; Local elected officials in Florida are pushing back against a bill that would strip them of their ability to regulate utility fuel sources; As the Legislature’s Republican leadership racks up the winning votes for its priorities, Democrats protest, but there’s really not much they can do; And a proud legacy of former Florida Governor Lawton Chiles could disappear if the current Legislature votes to abolish it.
  • On tonight’s program: Violent protests in Florida are now even more against the law than they used to be; Even before Governor DeSantis signed the protest bill, just the threat of it was giving this demonstrator in St. Petersburg pause; Lawmakers are working to find middle ground on spending plans including an initiative that would extend Medicaid coverage for new mothers; Local elected officials in Florida are pushing back against a bill that would strip them of their ability to regulate utility fuel sources; As the Legislature’s Republican leadership racks up the winning votes for its priorities, Democrats protest, but there’s really not much they can do; And a proud legacy of former Florida Governor Lawton Chiles could disappear if the current Legislature votes to abolish it.
  • On tonight’s program: Democrats say the Florida bill aimed at violent protests is racist and they’re preparing to take the issue to court; Three controversial Florida highway proposals have hit a serious roadblock; Supporters of a bill to educate parents about the sex education being taught in Florida’s public schools say local school districts will ignore it at their peril; A gambling agreement could be coming this year. But it might not happen this session; When might there be a special election to fill the congressional vacancy caused by the death of Alcee Hastings? So far, there’s no word from the governor who would have to make that call. That certainly has plenty of Democrats upset; And we go on a trek through Florida’s ever-diminishing wilderness in search of the elusive and endangered Florida panther.
  • On tonight’s program: Democrats say the Florida bill aimed at violent protests is racist and they’re preparing to take the issue to court; Three controversial Florida highway proposals have hit a serious roadblock; Supporters of a bill to educate parents about the sex education being taught in Florida’s public schools say local school districts will ignore it at their peril; A gambling agreement could be coming this year. But it might not happen this session; When might there be a special election to fill the congressional vacancy caused by the death of Alcee Hastings? So far, there’s no word from the governor who would have to make that call. That certainly has plenty of Democrats upset; And we go on a trek through Florida’s ever-diminishing wilderness in search of the elusive and endangered Florida panther.
  • On tonight’s program: A plan to term-limit school board members in Florida gets blowback from rural Republicans; It took some heavy negotiation, but a policing reform bill is now up and running in the Florida legislature; A move to expand the scope of practice for physicians’ assistants has been significantly watered down. Some say it’s a missed opportunity to expand access to health care; Big changes could be coming to Florida’s dysfunctional unemployment system; As Florida’s economy slowly recovers, there are more employers looking for workers, but a significant number of workers are still in need of jobs; And advancing through the legislature is a proposal to allow human paramedics to treat and transport police canines that are hurt in the line of duty.
  • On tonight’s program: A plan to term-limit school board members in Florida gets blowback from rural Republicans; It took some heavy negotiation, but a policing reform bill is now up and running in the Florida legislature; A move to expand the scope of practice for physicians’ assistants has been significantly watered down. Some say it’s a missed opportunity to expand access to health care; Big changes could be coming to Florida’s dysfunctional unemployment system; As Florida’s economy slowly recovers, there are more employers looking for workers, but a significant number of workers are still in need of jobs; And advancing through the legislature is a proposal to allow human paramedics to treat and transport police canines that are hurt in the line of duty.
  • On tonight’s program: Democrats, election supervisors and voting rights groups join in opposition to Florida’s proposed election law changes. But Republicans in the Legislature are forging ahead; Lots of politicians have been grousing about social media censorship. But a new survey suggests a lot of average folks in Florida don’t like those restrictions very much either; Lawmakers are working to clarify how non-emergency medical transportation for people who get benefits from both Medicare and Medicaid should be paid for; We speak with a disability rights advocate about a bill that would ban what are called “disability abortions”; And even though catastrophe was narrowly averted when an abandoned phosphate mine’s holding pond threatened to inundate nearby neighborhoods, the basic problem still has Florida officials flummoxed.
  • On tonight’s program: Democrats, election supervisors and voting rights groups join in opposition to Florida’s proposed election law changes. But Republicans in the Legislature are forging ahead; Lots of politicians have been grousing about social media censorship. But a new survey suggests a lot of average folks in Florida don’t like those restrictions very much either; Lawmakers are working to clarify how non-emergency medical transportation for people who get benefits from both Medicare and Medicaid should be paid for; We speak with a disability rights advocate about a bill that would ban what are called “disability abortions”; And even though catastrophe was narrowly averted when an abandoned phosphate mine’s holding pond threatened to inundate nearby neighborhoods, the basic problem still has Florida officials flummoxed.
  • When child abuse happens in Florida, the Network of Children's Advocacy Centers swings into action through its 27 regional agencies. They provide a safe, comforting environment for the children as their case is investigated and the Network also acts as a coordinator for the response of other organizations' involvement. To talk about it are: Cindy Vallely, the Network's executive director; and Board President Jackie Stephens.
  • When child abuse happens in Florida, the Network of Children's Advocacy Centers swings into action through its 27 regional agencies. They provide a safe, comforting environment for the children as their case is investigated and the Network also acts as a coordinator for the response of other organizations' involvement. To talk about it are: Cindy Vallely, the Network's executive director; and Board President Jackie Stephens.