science

Gulf Specimen Marine Lab via facebook

Hurricane Irma very nearly put a beloved Panhandle landmark out of business. But instead of closing their doors after 54 years, Panacea’s Gulf Specimen Marine Lab is up and running.

Jason Frankenfield

A crowd estimated at more than 2,000 marched to the Florida State Capitol on Saturday. It was part of a global Earth Day observance that in the U.S. included a battle against budget cuts to science-based programs and agencies proposed by the Trump Administration.

Buzzle.com

Florida is a prime breeding ground for invasive species that can threaten the state’s ecology and economy. For every lionfish or Burmese python that’s captured, thousands remain. And the sheer scope of the problem is pushing some lawmakers to ask how much of a difference state funding actually makes.

Kevin Cavanaugh via Smithsonian Institute / http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fewer-freezes-let-floridas-mangroves-move-north-180948075/

Mangroves are quintessentially tropical and take root along the coast of the Everglades and the Keys where they are home to colorful fish and crabs. But these plants are not marooned in South Florida anymore. WFSU went searching for mangroves along the state’s Gulf Coast.

tomato
Sean Hickin via flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sean_hickin/

Scientists have unlocked the secret to why so many supermarket tomatoes are tasteless. The findings mean there’s hope for delicious, marketable and affordable tomatoes. The miracles of modern agriculture mean tomatoes are available nearly year round. But ever wonder why those supermarket tomatoes turn out mushy and flavorless? That’s because growers favor bulky tomatoes with high yields and long shelf lives, and flavor got lost along the way.

Tom Flanigan

Thousands flocked to Saturday's 5th Annual Tallahassee Science Festival at Lake Ella. This was the final event under the direction of its founder.

Keta Browning / WFSU News

It was STEM Day at the Capitol Tuesday and students from across the state gathered with lawmakers to display their scientific achievements.

Science takes center stage this week as we play games about scientific discoveries both intentional and accidental. We'll get brainy with our Very Important Puzzler, Radiolab host Jad Abumrad, as he talks about his quest to become a science vampire. Plus, we roll the dice on clues about our favorite board games and find out the premises of fake TV show adaptations, from Finding Emo to Oy! Story.

Science Friday? Tallahassee Is In For A Science Weekend

Feb 14, 2013
Thomas Andrew Gustafson

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee is something you’d expect the cartoon kid-scientist Dexter to own. Three story high ceilings with plenty of caution signs, foot-thick wires and massive humming machines: all the tell-tale signs of scientists at work. And on Saturday, it will be showcasing some interesting experiments at its annual open house this Saturday.

Tim Murphy is one of the people overseeing the MagLab, and for Saturday only, a potato cannoneer. He says, science can be fun and kooky, and that’s what the MagLab is trying to show.

Innovation Park, the science incubator run by Leon County and Tallahassee, could see major organizational changes after an embezzlement scandal shook up leadership three years ago. Newly appointed chairwoman Kristin Dozier is proposing to transfer over most of the park’s buildings to private businesses and universities.  

Florida Solves Cold Cases with New DNA Test

Jul 25, 2012

Florida violent crime investigators are now solving cold cases with the help of a more advanced DNA test. The state has recently started using a test that can zero in on just male genetic material.

Four years ago, a woman was raped early one morning in suburban Gainesville. Despite several leads and tips called in to the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office, investigators had given up hope of finding her attacker and closed the case. Then, a few months ago, state labs began offering a new type of DNA analysis called a Y-STR test.