Capital Report: 10-20-2017

Oct 20, 2017

More than a dozen school districts are now challenging that part of a law that requires them to share their school construction money with charter schools.  But as Lynn Hatter reports, some of those same districts are also getting a portion of the extra funding the new law provides.

After Hurricane Irma hit Florida last month, many schools were out for days and even longer than that in the Keys.  That also meant pre-schools, including child care centers that serve newborn babies and toddlers, were also closed.  From member station WLRN in Miami, Nadege (nuh-DEDGE) Green tells us the economic toll on preschools after a storm affects families and the people who take care of their children.

After spiking last year, worker’s compensation rates in Florida are set to decline.  But Nick Evans reports some labor organizations contend the decrease doesn’t go far enough.

You haven’t done anything wrong, but you’re pulled over anyway. The law enforcement officer asks to search your car. Should that officer be required to tell you about your right to decline the search? As Sascha Cordner reports, Florida lawmakers have started discussions about that very topic for the 2018 legislative session.

Tim Padgett traveled from Florida to Guayama in Puerto Rico’s hard hit southeast to find out how residents there are handling storm recovery.

As more electric vehicles begin showing up on Florida’s streets, the state’s utilities and utility regulators are looking into what impact the cars could have on in the state’s electric infrastructure. Regan McCarthy has more...

Florida’s coastlines and cavern systems are dotted with historic sites, from World War II era shipwrecks, to Spanish galleons, to remnants of thousand year old civilizations. But there aren’t enough archaeologists to keep up with the underwater preservation. Kate Payne reports now the state is training amateur scuba divers to pick up some of the slack.