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Capital Report: 05-01-2015

When a food fight between the House and Senate spills over into the Florida Supreme Court, the process is a lot more complicated than trying to beat a traffic ticket. As Jim Ash reports, when politics and the law mix, nothing is ever as it seems.

And, right before this edition of Capital Report was going to air, the Florida Supreme Court ruled.  The majority opinion was, indeed the Florida House stands in technical violation of the State Constitution by adjourning early and unilaterally.  However, justices also said there was precious little they, or anyone else could do to compel House members to return to Tallahassee.  Senate Democrats were quick to claim a moral victory.  House Speaker Steve Crisafulli released a statement hoping better days lay ahead.  Senate President Gardiner pretty much said the same thing.  There’s still no firm date for lawmakers to head back to the Capitol.

The calamitous ending of the 2015 legislative session is making a great addition to the state’s history books. The 60-day lawmaking period didn’t start off well—and ended in disaster, lawsuits and charges of backstabbing. Lynn Hatter puts it to music.

Prison reform may be officially dead this session, but prison reform advocates remain hopeful there will be some meaningful reform for Florida’s troubled prison system. Sascha Cordner reports.

The legislature’s premature closure, Sine Die, meant vita mortis for a slew of much-anticipated bills, but some advocates for people with disabilities say their bills were taken nimium cito. Matthew Seeger reports on the bills that lived, died and what it all means for disabled Floridians… though, Deo gratias, not in Latin.

While many are raising their eyebrows at the House and Senate’s behavior this session, Regan McCarthy reports this isn’t the first time the state’s legislative session hasn’t gone as planned.