Tell Me More on 88.9 WFSU-FM

Weeknights, 8pm - 9pm

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners...personal experiences of life-changing travel...the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders...and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground...the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel MartinTell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle.

Singer Cesaria Evora was known for winning over international audiences with the slow, somber ballads about love and sorrow from her native Cape Verde islands. She always performed barefoot as a sign of solidarity with the impoverished women of her island. Guest host Allison Keyes speaks with NPR's Felix Contreras about the life and legacy of Evora.

Top Obama Advisor Makes West Wing Exit

Dec 21, 2011

Melody Barnes is leaving her post as director of the administration's Domestic Policy Council. Barnes was influential in crafting some of the president's major initiatives including health care and economic legislation. Host Michel Martin speaks with Barnes about her achievements and the president's popularity.

Great Books To Give Your Little Ones

Dec 21, 2011

A recently released children's book tells the story of how Duke Ellington brought swing to the holiday classic, 'The Nutcracker.' Also, Texan vampires go up against werewolves and were-armadillos in a popular young adult novel. These are just some of the books that top librarian Loriene Roy's list of holiday books. She speaks to host Michel Martin.

In the 20 years since her platinum debut album Little Earthquakes, legendary singer/songwriter Tori Amos has released 11 more studio albums and received 8 Grammy nominations. Fans have watched Amos reinvent herself and turn out hits in a range of genres. Host Michel Martin speaks with Amos about her latest album, Night of Hunters.

Genuine, passionate, powerful — that's as much of an introduction as Tori Amos needs. But for the past two decades, she's introduced her fans to plenty. She helped turn the piano into a rock instrument, showed that she can create big hits in different genres and challenged every critic who ever tried to put her in a box. And her 12th studio album, Night of Hunters, is no different.

Personal finance experts say the start of a new year is the perfect time to check your credit report. Host Michel Martin speaks with Tell Me More regular 'Money Coach' Alvin Hall about what to look for and how to boost your credit in 2012.

Three out of 4 moms consider their kids spoiled, according to a recent survey on Parenting.com. But the survey also found that most parents use the holidays as an opportunity to teach volunteerism and charity. Host Michel Martin discusses the challenges of instilling a spirit of giving with a diverse panel of moms.

Forget The Fads, Stick To Classic Toys

Dec 20, 2011

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hanukkah begins tonight, and since many people wait until the last minute to do that holiday shopping, some are probably still trying to figure out what to get for their favorite little people.

Last week, we talked about the newest electronic gifts, like this one.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Introducing Fijit Friends, a girl's interactive best friend. Fijit Friends say more than 150 different phrases.

Do You Need Your Mailman?

Dec 20, 2011

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, our money coach offers some end-of-the-year advice on keeping your credit clean during and after the festive season. That's coming up. But first, if you want those holiday cards to make it in time, then you better get them in the mail soon. Today is expected to be the busiest day of the year for the U.S. Postal Service and your last chance to guarantee first-class delivery before December 25th.

Is A Privatized Post Office Better?

Dec 20, 2011

Not everyone thinks the U.S. Postal Service is worth saving. Tad DeHaven of the Cato Institute says spiraling costs and uncertain revenues can be solved with privatization. Host Michel Martin and DeHaven discuss what a private postal service might look like.

What Will 'The Dear Leader's' Legacy Be?

Dec 19, 2011

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il died this past weekend. Host Michel Martin looks at the significance of Kim's death and what it means for the future of North Korea. She speaks with David Kang and Sandra Fahy of the Korean Studies Institute at USC.

On his new album, Celebrating Christmas, veteran jazz pianist Marcus Roberts turns out a ragtime rendition of "Joy to the World," as well as other smooth but cheerful versions of holiday classics like "Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!" Host Michel Martin speaks with Roberts about his desire to get toes tapping during the holidays.

Writer Gene Marks caused a ruckus online with his recent blog post offering advice on how poor back children can succeed in life. He drew a great deal of criticism, including a sharp response from author and blogger Baratunde Thurston of The Onion. Host Michel Martin speaks with Thurston about the controversy.

In 1988, a group of Maryland fifth-graders received college scholarships from two philanthropists. Now those students are in their 30s and their lives are chronicled in The Washington Post magazine. Host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Paul Schwartzman and one of those students about how the scholarship affected their lives.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

How Much Is Too Much Religion In Sports?

Dec 16, 2011

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll hear what some of you have to say about this week's program. Our BackTalk segment is in just a few minutes. But first, it's time for Faith Matters. That's the part of the program where we talk about matters of faith and spirituality, and once in a while, the intersection with sports.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the Tell Me More blogosphere and get to hear from you, our listeners. We also update you on some of the stories we've been covering. Ammad Omar is here with me once again. He's an editor here at TELL ME MORE. Welcome back, Ammad.

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Thanks, Michel.

MARTIN: What do you have?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chair for a shapeup this week are author Jimi Izrael, civil right attorney and author Arsalan Iftikhar, from the Log Cabin Republicans, executive director R. Clarke Cooper. He is also an Army Reserve captain. Thank you for your service.

R. CLARKE COOPER: Thank you.

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