Tell Me More on 88.9 WFSU-FM

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From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners...personal experiences of life-changing travel...the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders...and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground...the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel MartinTell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle.

OutLoud, a new StoryCorps project, records and amplifies the voices of the LGBTQ community.

Now 70, Patty Woods looks back to the late 1970s, when she met a woman who would become her partner — and leave a long-lasting mark on her life, despite the fact they were not able to be open about their relationship.

"I was working in a restaurant and she would come in every day for lunch. I was like, 'Oh my God, I want to know her,' " Woods tells her friend, 22-year-old Cedar Lay.

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MICHEL MARTIN: And finally, it's time for the feature we call In Your Ear. That's the part of the program where we typically ask some of the guests what they listen to, but as this program winds down - our last program is scheduled for August 1st, we thought it would be nice to hear what members of our staff are listening to - what they're playing when they aren't producing our groundbreaking show of course. So to start us off, let's hear the musical selections of one of our original and longest serving staff members - our director. Here's what's playing in his ear.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'd like to turn now to a new initiative from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - NASA. NASA wants to know how their technologies can best be applied commercially and they are asking you for ideas. Daniel Lockney is here to tell us more about this. He is NASA's technology transfer program executive and he was nice enough to stop by our Washington, D.C., studios. Welcome. Thanks for joining us.

DANIEL LOCKNEY: Absolutely. Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Black Men Can Be Emotional Eaters, Too

Jun 27, 2014

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Are Americans Bothered By Soccer?

Jun 27, 2014

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And I do want to mention that we reached out to the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and they said their response to the situation was explained in the letter that was sent to Kelly that we talked about on the program, and they have no further comment.

Business leaders and policymakers gathered at the White House to discuss how working families can get ahead. One participant explains how he feels companies can stay competitive and help families.

U.S. Sen. Tim Scott has become a leading conservative voice focused on building wealth among people of color. Scott tells host Michel Martin about his ideas for growing the economy.

Peter Anyang Nyong'o is a Kenyan senator. He's also the father of Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong'o. He talks to host Michel Martin about his own history and his family's newfound fame.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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I walked my kids to their first day of summer camp and we had a slight disagreement over exactly where and when I was to let them go.

My son preferred that I remain at the foot of the stairs that led into the building. And honestly, if he'd had his druthers, I think he'd have preferred that I stopped at the corner. Whereas my daughter preferred that I walk all the way up the stairs and inside the gym. Truth be told, she probably wouldn't have minded at all if I'd stayed through lunch.

I opted to ignore my son's eye-rolling and go with my daughter's preference.

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And finally today, it's time for the regular feature we call, In Your Ear. That's where we invite some of our guests to tell us about the top songs in their playlist. Actress Anika Noni Rose is both on Broadway and on the big screen right now. She's currently starring in "Half Of A Yellow Sun," which was filmed in Nigeria and South Africa. And she's one of the stars of the Tony-winning Broadway revival of "A Raisin In The Sun." When we caught up with her recently, she also talked about the music that lifts her spirits.

Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn's death has revived conversations about the use of smokeless tobacco in the sport. Tobacco and baseball researcher Ted Eaves discusses why so many players use it.

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