Apalachicola Bay

A river flanked by trees with its bottom revealed amid receding water levels
Suzanne Smith / WFSU-TV

North Florida’s drought conditions are expected to continue and there’s no sign of relief anytime soon. The lack of water is beginning to take a toll on the Apalachicola Bay and river. In Tallahassee alone, there were 16 days of 95 degree or higher temperatures this summer.

A view from the docks in the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Florida State University is getting $8 million  to study how to revive the Apalachicola Bay. The Board overseeing a settlement with BP from the 2010 oil spill approved the proposal Monday.

A shrimp boat heads out into the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Florida State University could get $8 million to come up with a plan to revitalize Franklin County’s Apalachicola Bay. A decade of natural and man-made disasters have crippled it, and by extension the community that depends on it. 

A wastewater treatment facility in North Florida.
JOHN S. QUARTERMAN VIA FLICKR

Multiple wastewater spills have been confirmed in Northwest Florida in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. The latest one is in Gulf County where sewage spilled into the Apalachicola River.

A mountain of oyster shells is a feature of Apalachicola, where the prized bivalves are a local delicacy.   2015
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to keep a decades long legal fight over water use alive is boosting hopes in North Florida. The state and its northern neighbor Georgia have been locked in a three-decade long fight over how much water each should get from a shared system.

A shrimp boat heads out into the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

The people and businesses that depend on the Apalachicola Bay just got a break from the U.S. Supreme Court—keeping a long running lawsuit over water use alive.

David Moynahan / David Moynahan Photography

A conference in Tallahassee is bringing together political officials, academics and conservation agencies who hope to make the Apalachicola River’s health a national discussion.

A shrimp boat heads out into the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

After years of conflict, the U.S. Supreme Court is taking up the case over Florida and Georgia’s water disputes. Somewhat surprisingly, the justices seem sympathetic to Florida’s problems, and that has some of the state’s advocates feeling optimistic.

Kate Payne via WFSU

The U.S. Supreme Court appears sympathetic to Florida’s complaints in a decades-long water dispute with Georgia. The court heard oral arguments in the case Monday.

Sustainable Tallahassee

There’s a new Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Volunteer and fundraiser Georgia Ackerman is taking over for the group’s long-serving leader Dan Tonsmeire. The transition comes as the state is preparing for a Supreme Court case about the future of the river.

Florida's "water war" with Georgia is not over. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that more legal briefs will be filed in the case, including allowing Florida to contest a special master's report that recommended a ruling in Georgia's favor. If the full amount of time is taken to file the briefs, it could extend a decision by the nation's highest court into late June.

A shrimp boat heads out into the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

With the U.S. Supreme Court expected later this week to review a recommendation that would deny Florida relief in its decades-old water dispute with Georgia, Attorney General Pam Bondi said Tuesday the case is not over yet.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

North Florida Congressman Neal Dunn wants to throw out a federal plan that would reduce freshwater flowing into the struggling Apalachicola Bay. The move comes after a Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against the state in the decades-long water war with Georgia. The Court has not yet made a final ruling. But Dunn and his colleagues are going back to the legislative drawing board to challenge the Army Corps of Engineers.

A view from the docks in the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master’s ruling favoring Georgia in a water fight impacting the Apalachicola Bay is being sent to the U.S. Supreme Court. Now two of Florida’s U.S. representatives are trying to hammer out another solution that could address Apalachicola’s problems.

Boats rest on a dock in the Apalachicola Bay
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master is recommending the U.S. Supreme Court rule against Florida in a decades-long fight over water use. The move is a big blow to the Big Bend’s Apalachicola Bay, which depends on water from the system.

Kevin Cavanaugh via Smithsonian Institute / http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fewer-freezes-let-floridas-mangroves-move-north-180948075/

Mangroves are quintessentially tropical and take root along the coast of the Everglades and the Keys where they are home to colorful fish and crabs. But these plants are not marooned in South Florida anymore. WFSU went searching for mangroves along the state’s Gulf Coast.

fishing boats
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

Federal regulators plan to divert more water from the Apalachicola - Chattahoochee - Flint River System to the state of Georgia.

Boats rest on a dock in the Apalachicola Bay
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Georgia is wrapping up its case this week in a nearly 30-year-old water fight with Florida and Alabama. The so-called water wars centers on consumption in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system shared by the states.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

A trial over a 26-year water fight between Florida and Georgia is underway before the U.S. Supreme Court.  A special master appointed by the court began hearing arguments Monday. 

Tom Flanigan

Things are getting worse for the people who've fished the Gulf waters for generations. A Wakulla County benefit over the weekend aimed to raise money and awareness for those who make their living from the sea.

Florida FWC
https://www.flickr.com/photos/myfwc/

The Gulf Coast is home to the most endangered sea turtle in the world: the Kemp’s Ridley. The fate of the turtles depends on the region’s coastal wetlands, where tropical storms, and oils spills have taken their toll. Here's a look into the uncertain future of the delicate ecosystem.

In the U.S. Senate, Florida and Alabama are pressuring Georgia to join a water-sharing compact for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system. But it could be too late downstream for scores of families who earned their livelihoods from the dying Apalachicola River.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

North Florida’s famous Apalachicola oysters are still under harvest limits. The crop has been devastated in recent years due to low water flow, and high salinity levels.

Tallahassee Kicks Off Sustainability Conference

Mar 22, 2016
Stephen Nakatani/ flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/snakphotography/5037094847/

Community leaders, researchers and business owners are converging on Tallahassee this week for a conference on sustainable living.

Attendees milling around the Army Corps of Engineers' open house.
Nick Evans

The Army Corps of Engineers is developing a water management plan for the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, Flint River system.  But many in north Florida are crying foul, because the plan ignores impacts in Apalachicola Bay.

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