scope of practice

Tallahassee Community College

Florida has joined a multi-state nursing compact making it easier for nurses from other states to practice here. And some highly trained nurses and physician assistants can now prescribe controlled medications.

taxcredits.net

Florida lawmakers are bracing for budget holes despite figures showing the state could end up with another year of surplus. Alternative healthcare proposals making their way through the Florida legislature as lawmakers look for ways to cut health costs without accepting billions in federal dollars to expand Medicaid.

FMA President Dr. Allen Pillersdorf argues against expanded nurse powers in the House Health Innovation Committee on 3/25/15.
The Florida Channel

A plan to expand the powers of advanced registered nurses hasn’t yet caught on in the legislature, but eased out of a House Health panel Wednesday. The fate of bill remains cloudy, but its sponsor says even if it fails this year—the issue isn’t going away.

The nation’s health care delivery system is undergoing major changes, and the lines between what different healthcare providers do is beginning to blur. That’s the backdrop for fights between doctors, nurses and pharmacists, and those fights have become an annual occurrence at Florida’s Capitol, as each group tries to increase or maintain its scope-of-practice.

To put it plainly, these are turf battles. At the center is this debate: access, versus quality. 

A decades-long fight between optometrists and ophthalmologists could be resolved this year. The legislature is considering a bill that would allow optometrists to prescribe oral medications.  The debate has been dubbed, “the Eyeball Wars” but ophthalmologists say the fight isn’t over turf, it’s about patient safety.

Optometrists have wanted to be able to prescribe oral medications for years, says former state Republican Senator Durrell Peaden.

Some Florida healthcare providers are pushing lawmakers to make changes that would allow them to offer more services to patients. But  other physician groups are concerned that the move could result in worse care for consumers.

An almost 40-year old scuffle between two kinds of eye care professionals could be coming close to an end. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, despite passage of a bill that could do so, opponents say ending the war at the cost of limiting the amount of legitimate medical malpractice claims is not the way to do it.

It’s an ongoing dispute known as the “eyeball wars” between ophthalmologists and optometrists. Both professions deal with eye care, but there’s one difference:

Ophthalmologists are medical doctors, while optometrists are not.