immigration

A group of Florida lawmakers say students who have gone to high school in the state should be allowed to go to college without paying out-of-state tuition – regardless of their immigration status. But Regan McCarthy reports a bill that would make that happen, faces an uphill battle.

Evelyn Rivera says she’s lived in Florida for almost as long as she can remember...

“I’m from Orlando Florida, but I’m originally from Columbia. I came to the United States with my family when I was about 3 years old, and I’ve been living in the central Florida area for about 20 years now.”

Capital Report: 02-10-2012

Feb 10, 2012

Battle lines are being drawn in Florida. Democrats filed a lawsuit against a congressional redistricting map immediately after it was approved by the Republican-controlled Legislature.  The Democrats contend that map and ones approved for the Florida House and Senate    violate new anti-gerrymandering standards. And James Call tells us, they and non-partisan groups that worked to pass the new law say the maps are attempts to circumvent the law and manipulate the political process.   

Sascha Cordner

Several Democratic lawmakers gathered at the Capitol Wednesday to garner support for a bill that would grant in-state tuition to undocumented students if they meet certain conditions. Sascha Cordner has more.

A measure that would allow the children of illegal immigrants in-state tuition has been rejected by a Senate Committee. Lynn Hatter reports the vote came after hours of emotional testimony and ended in a tie.

A bill that several lawmakers say would end tuition discrimination in Florida could help one young man fulfill his goal. As Sascha Cordner reports, the bill’s sponsors are using that young man as an example to show that all residents, regardless of their background, should have the right to pay in-state tuition.

18-year-old Renato Lherisson, the son of undocumented immigrants, is a native of Miami.

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