Sascha Cordner

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Sascha Cordner has more than ten years of public radio experience. It includes working at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both radio and TV, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She is the recipient of 15 awards from the Associated Press, Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), and Edward R. Murrow. Her award-winning stories include her coverage on the infamous “Dozier School for Boys” and a feature titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A mosquito on a person's skin
icon0.com / Pexels

With a new one reported this month, Bay County now has three cases of the West Nile Virus. Health officials are urging residents to be cautious of the mosquito-borne illness.

A row of Tallahassee police cars
Tallahassee Police Department Facebook

The union representing law enforcement officers in the Florida Panhandle say they’re going to fight the recent firing of a Tallahassee Police officer.

The inside of the Leon County Supervisor of Elections office with a vote sign
Leon County Supervisor of Elections twitter

Floridians who want to request a vote by mail ballot have until Wednesday to do so.

Sen. David Simmons (R-Altamonte Springs) is the main author of Florida's Stand Your Ground law.
Sen. David Simmons' Facebook page

Last week, Florida’s Stand Your Ground law took center stage as people rallied, protested, and marched over the killing of a black unarmed man during a dispute over a handicapped parking space.

The shooter, a white man, was never arrested. That is, until earlier this week, when the Pinellas County State Attorney decided to file charges.

Last week, Sascha Cordner spoke to the main author of Stand Your Ground, who weighed in on the case and the law before the charges were filed. But, first, what led up to this point?

A container full of scallops
Carol Lyn Parrish / FWC Flickr

The bay scallop season in Gulf County started Friday.

Nikkie Cox found this tagged lionfish off Franklin County. Photo courtesy of Nikkie Cox.
Nikkie Cox

There are a few weeks left to go in the state’s Lionfish Challenge. That’s an effort to rid Florida waters of the invasive species that has no natural predators and has a negative impact on wildlife.

A doctor is sharing health information with their patient
rawpixel.com / Unsplash

Bay County health officials are inviting the public to a meeting Thursday to discuss ways to better identify and address area residents’ health needs.

An alligator
Karen Parker / FWC Flickr

The statewide recreational hunting of Florida’s alligators began Wednesday.

Tallahassee Community College’s Women’s Basketball team
TCC Eagles Facebook

During their Tuesday meeting, Governor Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet recognized a local women’s basketball team for receiving a national championship title earlier this year.

Joined by her Attorney Ben Crump and others, Brittany Jacobs speaks during a news conference inside a Tallahassee church prior to a march to the capitol Wednesday.
Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

Last month’s killing of a man during a dispute over a parking space has revived the conversation about a repeal of Florida’s Stand Your Ground law. The overall debate surrounding the controversial self defense law is also having an impact on Florida's elections.

Florida Department of Children and Families Secretary Mike Carroll
Florida Channel

The head of Florida’s child welfare agency is stepping down.

A number of pill bottles
Florida Department of Health's Take Control Website

With a new opioid law in effect, Florida health officials are educating the public on some of the new changes through a new campaign.

Walton County Sheriff's office website

The Walton County Sheriff’s office is hoping to better assist residents with differing special needs with the kick off of a new program.

Facebook logo
Pixabay / Pexels

A Florida Panhandle man may be one of the first charged under a new law for posting threatening messages on social media.

A child buckling their seatbelt
rawpixel.com / Pexels

August is Child Safety Awareness Month, and Florida officials are reminding motorists to always buckle up their kids.

A mother with her baby in a nursery
Nikolay Osmachko / Pexels

This week is National Breastfeeding Week, and Bay County health officials will be holding an event this weekend to promote breastfeeding and help mothers.

grayscale photography of raindrops
Reza Shayestehpour / Unsplash

With the heavy rains these past few days, Bay County health officials are urging residents to take proper precautions to prevent illnesses during and after flooding. That includes not allowing children to play in flood waters since it could be contaminated by sewage. Health Department spokeswoman Heather Kretzer says there’s also a tip for private well owners.

Back to school supplies, like pencils, pens, and notebooks
TicketToDream.org

Florida’s child welfare agency is partnering with other groups to hold its first ever “Back to School Supply Drive” for foster care kids.

The "Liberator," an example of the 3D-printable gun.
Defense Distributed website

Blueprints on how to make a functional 3D printed gun at home are now available online. But, Florida’s U.S. Senator Bill Nelson is among several Democrats calling on President Trump to step in.

scallops
FWC FWRI's Flickr

Starting Wednesday, there will be no swimming, boating, fishing, or scalloping in certain areas of St. Joseph Bay.

A stethoscope
Marcelo Leal / Unsplash

Bay County health officials are reporting an additional human case of the West Nile Virus. They’re urging residents to remain diligent in protecting themselves from mosquitoes.

Leon Evans, a former inmate, counts himself as a success of Transition House, a reentry program to help inmates have an easier time to transition back into society.
Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

Some blame the state legislature for not fully funding Florida’s corrections budget. Prison officials say that led to them making some hard choices. Among those choices: cutting funding to programs helpful to inmates trying to transition back into society—as we hear in the last installment of Sascha Cordner’s two-part series.

Members of the LCSO Traffic Unit accepted a Traffic Safety Program Award on July 13th.
Leon County Sheriff's Office

Leon County Sheriff’s Office has won a statewide award for having one of the best traffic safety programs in Florida.

Register-To-Vote-Florida.gov
RegisterToVoteFlorida.gov

After numerous complaints last week, Florida’s election agency says the glitches on its online voter registration website are fixed. But, if anyone sees any other issues going forward, they’re urged to report them immediately.

Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Julie Jones meets with inmates at the Wakulla Correctional Institution, March 8, 2016.
Florida Department of Corrections facebook

The state budget officially went into effect earlier this month. That includes Florida’s prison budget, which led to prison officials cutting funding to programs helpful to inmates trying to transition back into society. While some blame the Florida legislature, others want to stop playing the blame game and move forward. In the first installment of her series, WFSU's Sascha Cordner digs into what led up to this point.

Pages