Marsy's Law

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A national campaign successfully placed Marsy’s Law on the books in Florida last year. The amendment put a crime victim bill of rights in the state Constitution. When the measure took effect in January, supporters argued it was self-implementing. But eight months later, there’s still no consensus on the amendment’s vague language. It even pits parts of the state constitution against each other.

Bret Hartman / AP Images for Marsy'sLawForAll.org

Victims’ rights group, Marsy’s Law for Florida, is launching a social media campaign that it says will help explain 2018’s Amendment 6.

First Amendment Foundation President Barbara Petersen addresses  gathering of Florida Associated Press broadcasters in Orlando.
Florida Associated Press Broadcasters

The First Amendment Foundation (FAF) in Tallahassee keeps watch over policy discussions that could impede the public’s right to know about government business.

“We track all bills that affect the public’s ability to oversee government and hold it accountable," says FAF president Barbara Petersen.

The foundation tracked 111 bills this year that would create new open government exemptions or extend current exemptions. 25 of them passed.

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Victim rights protections under Marsy’s Law are now enshrined in the state Constitution. But many state agencies are struggling to interpret the broad language, most recently law enforcement.

marsy's law.org

Floridians voted to put protections for crime victims in the state constitution, but lawmakers and officials are grappling with how to put the measure into practice.

Marsy's Law for Florida

Voters will decide whether to place victims’ rights in the Florida Constitution this November.

Advocates say it’s necessary to give victims a voice in the criminal justice process. But opponents argue these rights already exist under Florida law. 

Sunday marked the beginning of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. And the week of awareness is part of a push to expand victims’ rights in Florida’s constitution.

marsy's law.org

A walk honoring and raising awareness for the victims of violent crime took place at Tallahassee's Cascades Park on Sunday, April 8. Organizers are hoping victims' rights become a stronger part of Florida law later this year.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

Floridians could soon vote on a proposal to grant victims more rights during court proceedings. That matter will first go before the Florida Constitution Revision Commission—which meets every 20 years to revise the state’s constitution. Voters would later have their say on the 2018 ballot.