WFSU News · Tallahassee · Panama City · Thomasville
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

FWC Wants Residents' Help In Reporting Rare Snake Sightings

Florida wildlife officials are asking for residents’ help in reporting sightings of rare snakes. They’re working to determine whether the snakes should be bumped up to the federal endangered status.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists want the public to report sightings of three snakes: the Florida pine snake, southern hognose snake, and short-tailed snake. FWC Spokesman Kevin Baxter says with residents help, researchers can then determine whether these snakes qualify as a federally threatened species.

“Basically, these are snakes that are somewhat rarely seen. So, we are trying to get a handle on their status and where they are occurring in the state. So, these snake species usually occur in drier, blander habitats, and really only occasionally spend time above ground. A lot of times they’re underground,” said Baxter.

Residents should report the sightings to the FWC online. For each report, residents should include the location, month, and year of where they saw the snakes. Baxter says photos of the snakes for verification purposes are welcome as well. And, he adds it also does not matter whether the snakes are dead or alive.

“So, whether they’re dead or alive, that will give us an idea of where they’re occurring and help with the status in that regard. It also doesn’t matter if you were hiking last weekend and saw one of these snakes or if you were hiking 10 years ago, and you took a photo of one of these snakes, and you remember where you were at that point, we’d still be interested in getting that report through the website,” Baxter added.

For more news updates, follow Sascha Cordner on twitter @SaschaCordner.

Sascha Cordner has more than ten years of public radio experience. It includes working at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both radio and TV, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications. She is the recipient of 15 awards from the Associated Press, Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), and Edward R. Murrow. Her award-winning stories include her coverage on the infamous “Dozier School for Boys” and a feature titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink." Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU. Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter:@SaschaCordner.