Planned Parenthood

Anna Malefatto / Planned Parenthood of South Florida and the Treasure Coast

Women’s health advocates from Planned Parenthood are calling on Florida lawmakers to expand insurance coverage to more than 1 million low-income people. The group is the latest of many who are rallying in support of the government’s expanding healthcare. Meanwhile the Florida Legislature continues debating a couple of health care proposals.

Students and adults from around the state gathered Monday on the steps of Florida’s Old Historic Capitol. They held signs that said “I stand with Planned Parenthood.”

Several abortion bills are now headed to the Florida House floor, after clearing their last committee stop Wednesday. They include a bill that seeks to ban abortions based on the sex or gender of the unborn child. But, lawmakers had mixed feelings on the issue, at times voting against their own party.

The abortion issue is always a controversial one, and each year, at least one abortion bill inflames passions among Florida lawmakers as they vet the issue.

A couple of House panels took up several bills Wednesday that were abortion-related. They include a ban on having an abortion based on sex or gender and another that would require the care for infants born alive after an abortion procedure. While all the bills passed out of their respective committees, it was not without controversy. 

A Florida lawmaker is working to overturn an historic U.S. Supreme decision from 40 years ago called Roe v. Wade. It essentially establishes the right to have an abortion. But, some say now may not be the right time for the state to move forward with legislation that would essentially ban abortions.

“I didn’t do that intentionally. Had I finished the bill early last week, I would have filed it last week. It just happened to fall on the 40th anniversary, which I’m actually glad,” said Representative Charles Van Zant.

Voters in Florida rejected most of the proposed constitutional amendments on their ballots Election Day. Critics have even partly blamed the historically long ballot for the long lines at polling places. Out of 11, only three gained 60-percent of the votes needed to pass.

Sascha Cordner

With about 11 constitutional amendments on the November ballot, we’re continuing our series by exploring one of the most talked about amendments: Amendment 6. It essentially would prohibit the use of taxpayer dollars for abortions, except in certain cases, and there are several campaigns for both sides of the issue. While some say a vote “yes” would allow politicians to interfere with a women’s right to choose, others say a vote “no” would block future attempts to allow parents to have a say if their child wants an abortion.

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