Mary McLeod Bethune

Mary McLeod Bethune in front of White Hall at Bethune-Cookman University.
public domain via Florida Memory

The Florida Legislature is poised to make good on a 2016 decision to replace one of its entries in Washington D.C.’s statuary hall.  Mary McLeod Bethune seems likely to get the nod.

Mary McLeod Bethune
Florida Memory / https://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/152989

After a hiccup last year in the Florida House, state lawmakers seem poised to send a statue of civil rights activist and educator Mary McLeod Bethune to Washington D.C.  

Mary McLeod Bethune
Florida State Archives

A South Florida Senator is trying again to send a statue of Mary McLeod Bethune to represent Florida in Washington D.C’s Statuary Hall.  The current statue is confederate general Edmund Kirby Smith.

Mary McLeod Bethune
Florida Memory / https://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/152989

Florida lawmakers want to put a statue of Mary McLeod Bethune in the U.S. Capitol. But the internationally renowned educator and activist isn’t the only contender.

National Statuary Hall.
US Capitol via Wikimedia Commons

A state board has narrowed the field to three in a bid to replace a statue of confederate general Edmund Kirby Smith in Washington D.C.  The state Legislature will now choose among a grocer, an environmentalist, and an educator.

One of three finalists will be chosen to replace Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith.
Architect of the Capitol

The Great Floridians committee is recommending an educator, an environmentalist, or a grocer to represent the state in Washington D.C.’s Statuary Hall. 

Mary McLeod Bethune
Florida State Archives

A state historical council asked who should represent Florida in Washington D.C.’s Statuary Hall, and the results are clear.  The public heavily favors educator and civil rights activist Mary McLeod Bethune.

Sascha Cordner

Governor Rick Scott joined other officials at the Capitol Wednesday in the induction of the first members into the Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame. Sascha Cordner has more.

The Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame sprang out of a 2010 bill, co-authored by the now Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll, Democratic Representative Alan Williams, and former Senator Tony Hill.

In commemorating the last day of Black History Month, they joined other community leaders as well as Governor Rick Scott in the induction of the hall of fame’s first members: