James Madison Institute

Chauncey Davis via wikimedia commons

The Everglades Foundation is touting the economic benefits of water storage south of Lake Okeechobee.

James Madison Institute

Opponents of Senate President Joe Negron’s call for building a massive water storage area South of Lake Okeechobee are turning up the heat.

The free-market leaning James Madison Institute is distancing itself from comments made by one of its vice presidents regarding the motives behind a utility-backed solar amendment.

Florida Department of Corrections' youtube channel

The Florida Department of Corrections is starting to implement a new program aimed at making sure released offenders don’t come back to the state’s prison system. Prison officials say Spectrum is a research-based program unique to Florida.

James Madison Institute

Florida lawmakers should take a comprehensive approach to reforming the state’s criminal justice system. That’s according to a new poll by a free market think-tank.

Rasmus Bøgeskov Larsen via Flickr

Free-market think tank The James Madison Institute is weighing in on Everglades restoration.  The organization wants policymakers to focus their efforts north of Lake Okeechobee.

Pelican Post

A bill seeking to reform Florida’s Retirement System is now heading to the House floor, despite continued opposition.

Sal Nuzzo's page on the James Madison Institute website

As lawmakers return to the capitol to tie up loose ends, many tax-minded Floridians may wonder what the emergency session means for them.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

The sponsor of a measure aimed at overhauling the state’s pension system says that effort’s dead, but bill supporters and opponents alike say they won’t declare the win or loss until the 2014 Legislative Session comes to an end.

It’s Day 59 of the 60-day legislative Session. But, with session coming close to close, a procedural move by Clearwater Republican Senator Jack Latvala Wednesday may have blocked this year’s effort to overhaul the state’s pension system.

MGN Online

In the last several days, a number of bills aimed at helping Florida’s criminal justice and juvenile justice systems have passed in either chamber of the state Legislature. They range from a measure to prevent inmate escapes to another that aims to revamp the juvenile justice system.

Bill Addressing Inmate Escapes

Making sure prison release orders are properly verified is the goal of bill authored by Sen. Greg Evers (R-Baker) in his capacity as chair of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee.

LHatter / WFSU News

Over the past several years Governor Rick Scott has touted Florida as a refuge from “burdensome regulations” and has made it a goal to promote job creation in the state. But as Florida’s unemployment rate has fallen below the national average some groups argue the state continues to over-regulate businesses—and one group is targeting several industries it says are prime for de-regulation.

myflorida.com

A bill aiming to reform Florida’s juvenile justice system recently won unanimous support during its first Senate hearing. But, some say the measure could still do more.

Fleming Island Republican Senator Rob Bradley’s bill aims to rewrite Florida law that governs juvenile justice to focus on ways to help the state’s delinquent kids. Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters says it’s the first time in more than a decade there’s been a revision, and she’s on board.

James Madison Institute

As Florida looks to make sure released inmates don’t return to prison, should the Sunshine state look to other states, like Georgia, to learn about their criminal justice reforms?

Housing about 102,000 inmates, Florida’s prison system is the third-largest in the U.S. According to state economists, that number is projected to increase in the next few years. A contributing factor is the number of released inmates going back to prison. Recently, some, including current and former Florida officials, heard from their counterparts in Georgia about efforts there to reduce recidivism…

Jessica Palombo / WFSU-FM

Elementary school children across Florida are getting a lesson in thrift this week, courtesy of limited-government think tank, the James Madison Institute. Thrift Week kicked off Thursday with Benjamin Franklin paying some Tallahassee students a visit.

If founding father Benjamin Franklin were still alive, he would have turned 307 on Thursday.

Lloyd Wheeler, a Franklin impersonator, said he would spend his birthday talking to this fine group of students and maybe having a mug of rum punch later this evening.”