Amy Baker

DXR via wikimedia commons

The outlook is grim again for Florida’s budget drafters—and that’s before considering the cost of Hurricane Irma.  State forecasters are warning the coffers are nearly empty for the third year running.

EDR Coordinator Amy Baker describing the changes in the conference's newest estimates.
Nick Evans

State economists are revising their fiscal projections upward, but the extra dollars likely won’t be enough to stave off deep budget cuts when lawmakers start balancing the books. 

Buoyed by strong tourism numbers and population growth, Florida is experiencing a steady but uneven recovery, the Legislature’s chief economist is telling Tallahassee business leaders.

Jeff Kubina

The state’s economists are looking into the revenue slot machines are expected to produce this year. Estimators are seeing lower numbers from some locations, including one in Flagler. Chief Economist Amy Baker says that change could be connected to Hurricane Matthew, but that’s not the only explanation.

House Speaker Richard Corcoran.
Florida House of Representatives / Florida House of Representatives

Florida lawmakers will face some tough decisions next year as they draft the state budget.  Leaders are already warning cuts are in store.

Daniel Piraino via Flickr

Florida gets a good return on its investment when it spends money on its beaches. That’s according to a study from the state’s top economists.

Nick Evans

Florida House and Senate leaders are bragging about a $635 million surplus in the coming year.  The outlook might not be quite as rosy as it looks.

taxcredits.net

Florida’s Medicaid costs will soon take up about half of the state’s new revenue. And enrollment in the program continues to grow. The increasing costs of the program has the state’s chief economist putting part of the blame on prescription drugs.

A map representing the 13 regions for Medicaid Managed Care
Agency For Healthcare Administration

Florida’s Medicaid Managed Care program is expected to get more expensive. State economists expect the cost to grow by more than a half-billion dollars next year.