Kate Payne

Multimedia Reporter

As a Tallahassee native, Kate Payne grew up listening to WFSU. She loves being part of a station that had such an impact on her. Kate is a graduate of the Florida State University College of Motion Picture Arts. With a background in documentary and narrative filmmaking, Kate has a broad range of multimedia experience. When she’s not working, you can find her rock climbing, cooking or hanging out with her cat.

Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Earlier this month, a U.S. Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against Florida in its decades-long water war with Georgia. As the court prepares to make its final decision, lawmakers are going back to the legislative drawing board. WFSU News went to the coast to see what the ruling means for the struggling Apalachicola Bay and its world famous oysters.

Historic Capitol
Tom Flanigan / WFSU News

State lawmakers want to make it harder for Floridians to amend the constitution. The plan would up the percentage of voter approval needed to pass a measure from 60 percent to more than 66 percent.

The Oz Blog / http://blog.doctoroz.com/oz-experts/myths-lies-and-hysterectomy

If state lawmakers get their way, patients could soon be able to sue their abortion doctors over emotional distress. But physicians say the plan will worsen Florida’s doctor shortage. For many Florida doctors, medical malpractice complaints are part of the territory. After years of discouraging frivolous lawsuits, legislators are now trying to expose abortion doctors to more litigation.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

North Florida Congressman Neal Dunn wants to throw out a federal plan that would reduce freshwater flowing into the struggling Apalachicola Bay. The move comes after a Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against the state in the decades-long water war with Georgia. The Court has not yet made a final ruling. But Dunn and his colleagues are going back to the legislative drawing board to challenge the Army Corps of Engineers.

Buzzle.com

Florida is a prime breeding ground for invasive species that can threaten the state’s ecology and economy. For every lionfish or Burmese python that’s captured, thousands remain. And the sheer scope of the problem is pushing some lawmakers to ask how much of a difference state funding actually makes.

Federal Highway Administration / http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/photos/75957

State regulators are moving forward with plans to widen Crawfordville Highway, despite concerns about the impacts to nearby Wakulla Springs. Conservationists hoped the state would amend the design to reduce pollution and add animal crossings.

Kate Payne

Conservationists are making a final push against plans to widen Crawfordville Highway, which they say will harm nearby Wakulla Springs. The effort to add two lanes of traffic to the road is years in the making, as a way to facilitate commuter traffic between Wakulla and Leon Counties. The design includes four storm-water ponds, and requires the use of forty-two acres of park land. Bob Deyle is a retired professor of environmental planning at Florida State University, and vice chair of the Wakulla Springs Alliance.

sama093 via flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sama093/

Florida’s invasive species problem can be daunting, with real implications for the state’s ecology and economy. The breadth of the issue is spurring some lawmakers to ask if state funding makes a difference.

Kevin Cavanaugh via Smithsonian Institute / http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fewer-freezes-let-floridas-mangroves-move-north-180948075/

Mangroves are quintessentially tropical and take root along the coast of the Everglades and the Keys where they are home to colorful fish and crabs. But these plants are not marooned in South Florida anymore. WFSU went searching for mangroves along the state’s Gulf Coast.

iStockphoto

A South Florida lawmaker wants patients to be able to donate their healthcare data in the same way they donate their organs. Republican Senator Jeff Brandes of St Petersburg is passionate about innovation, and champions self-driving cars and drone technology. Now he’s turning his sights on electronic health records.

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