Jim Ash

Reporter/Producer

Jim Ash is a reporter at WFSU-FM.  A Miami native, he is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience, most of it in print.  He has been a member of the Florida Capital Press Corps since 1992.

Ash has worked variously as a reporter, columnist and bureau chief.  His specialties include state politics, the judicial system and the environment.  His career has included coverage of everything from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster and Hurricane Andrew to the Florida presidential recount.

Ash is a graduate of the University of Iowa where he earned a degree in English.  He spent his summers interning for newspapers, including the Austin-American Statesman in Texas.

A hiking enthusiast, Ash has explored most of the public trails in California's Big Sur.  He is an avid reader who enjoys traveling, exploring the Big Bend, and water sports.

Naples Daily News

Two weeks after Hurricane Irma’s horrific pounding, and with two months left in the Atlantic Hurricane season, Florida’s emergency management chief is heading out the door.

Tampa Bay Times

Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis is urging business leaders to turn up the political heat for insurance reform.

James Clarke Ash

City officials began installing the first of more than 200,000 photovoltaic panels Tuesday on a 120-acre solar farm on airport property.

Fallout from Hurricane Irma is reaching the foundation of Florida’s government as the powerful Constitution Revision Commission considers extending key deadlines.

WFSU

Democratic lawmakers are calling once again for a Florida slavery memorial after a previous attempt died at the hands of a powerful Republican committee chairman.

A Florida lawmaker says this weekend’s deadly church shooting in Nashville should bolster support for his proposal to loosen gun restrictions in religious institutions.

Big Bend environmentalists are sounding the alarm about a Mississippi company’s plans to drill for oil on 10 thousand acres in Calhoun County, about an hour west of Tallahassee.

Proterra

Tallahassee officials are eagerly anticipating a million-dollar federal grant they hope to translate to a breath of fresh air.

NPR

With losses total in some areas of the state, Florida’s iconic citrus industry will need Congressional help to recover from Hurricane Irma, according to Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran is appointing a select committee to study Hurricane Irma response and disaster preparedness. 

MCM

Some good news and bad news signal Florida state government is slowly returning to normal in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

WUSF

State regulators say the 335,000 insurance claims filed by Hurricane Irma victims already outstrip the two storms that blasted Florida last year.

AP

All students in 48 Florida counties will be eligible for free lunches after the U.S. Department of Agriculture decided to help communities hardest hit by Hurricane Irma.

Washington Times

Calling the Hurricane Irma-related deaths of eight people in South Florida a preventable tragedy, a Plantation Democrat wants to force nursing homes to have a five-day emergency power supply. 

St. Petersburg Times

Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam says Hurricane Irma has left the state’s iconic citrus industry in tatters.

CNBC

The Port of Key West remains closed in the wake of Hurricane Irma, and the Coast Guard is urging boaters to stay away.

laborsouthflorida.org

The Florida AFL-CIO is still determining how many of its approximately 1 million active members, retirees and their families were impacted by Hurricane Irma.

Thinkspot, Inc.

Rebuilding Florida’s brand won’t be easy in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

AFP/Getty Images

Hurricane Irma’s state-engulfing radar signature and widespread damage will be a hard image to shake, but tourism experts say Florida’s biggest industry will rebound.

James Clarke Ash

The mood was surprisingly upbeat among Hurricane Irma survivors who trekked to the Leroy Collins Library to charge cell phones and laptops and stock up on bottled water.

James Clarke Ash

Shortly before curfew Sunday night, about 150 Florida State University students lounged on inflatable matrasses and sleeping bags on the Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center floor.

Hurricane Irma blasted the Florida Keys early Sunday morning with Category 4 winds and driving rain, and Governor Rick Scott is warning Floridians to heed the deadly threat.

Irma is expected to bring hurricane force winds and flooding to the Big Bend area sometime after 6 p.m., with winds lasting through early Monday morning. Officials predicted a storm surge in Northwest Florida of between 4 and 6 feet.

National Weather Service

Tallahassee residents can be forgiven if Hurricane Irma brings on a strong feeling of Déjà vu.

Managers of Tallahassee’s Kearney Center are sheltering up to 400 Big Bend homeless residents per night and expecting 20 to 50 more as Hurricane Irma approaches.

Already decimated by disease, Florida citrus growers are vowing not to let Hurricane Irma deliver an industry  death blow.

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