George Zimmerman

UPDATE at 11:10 a.m. EST:

Judge Kenneth Lester says George Zimmerman can go free as he awaits trial if he posts a $150,000 bail.

Lester said as a condition of his release, Zimmerman would be electronically monitored, could have no contact with Trayvon Martin's family and would be prohibited from possessing firearms or using alcohol. He will also be on a curfew and have to check in every three days.

The judge said once he is assured that security measures have been met, Zimmerman will be freed.

WASHINGTON- Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law is under intense scrutiny after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was fatally shot by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. Calls to repeal the law have intensified but the controversy neatly fits into the legal community’s natural divide. Trimmel Gomes examines why prosecutors decry the law, while defense attorneys are willingly embracing it.

Florida’s “Stand Your Ground Law” has been pushed into the national spotlight after a 17 year-old, Trayvon Martin, was shot and killed by Sanford neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. Prosecutors have long been against “Stand Your Ground” because they believe it makes it more difficult to prosecute serious crimes like murder cases. But with increasing calls to repeal the law, defense attorneys say that would be a terrible mistake. We hear both sides of the argument:

 

Guests:

State Attorney, Willie Meggs of the 2nd judicial Circuit,

The man who says he shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in self defense is now in custody. Regan McCarthy reports George Zimmerman turned himself in after officials issued a warrant for his arrest Wednesday.

Angela Corey, the Special Prosecutor in the case announced during a press conference Wednesday evening that she’s charging Zimmerman with second degree murder. Corey says her goal is to use the facts to get “justice” for the “victim” in the case.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is backing a national effort to overturn so-called “Stand your Ground" laws. As Trimmel Gomes reports, the mayor says the laws make America less safe.

Bloomberg, along with groups such as the NAACP are calling on states like Florida to repeal, amend or defeat what he calls “shoot first” laws. He says the laws only promote vigilantism, pointing to the Trayvon Martin case an example.

“It’s now clear that these laws have undermined the integrity of the justice system and done real harm to public safety.”

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