First District Court of Appeal

DeSantis speaks at a podium during a press conference
Wilfredo Lee / AP

Gov. Ron DeSantis says he thinks the legislature acted within its authority when enacting the medical marijuana implementing bill. 

Marijuana plants in a grow house.
Eric Risberg / AP

The Florida House of Representatives wants a say in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of state medical marijuana regulations. The chamber's lawyers asked a Tallahassee appeals court Tuesday for a chance to intervene.

Cannabis Factory
Claude Jin / Adobe Stock

Florida courts have spoken. They say the state’s medical marijuana distribution system is unconstitutional, and that could soon force the legislature and the industry to make changes.

Jars Of Cannabis Flowers
Ayehab / Adobe Stock

One Florida lawmaker says the legislature could get a do-over on implementing the state’s 2016 medical marijuana amendment after the First Discrict Court of Appeal handed down an opinion Tuesday calling the current setup unconstitutional.

Governor Rick Scott in his office in front of a Florida flag
Office of Gov. Rick Scott

The First District Court of Appeal ruled Gov. Rick Scott doesn’t have to release calendar and travel records.

An AIDS advocacy group sued Scott for refusing to release the documents as part of a public records request. 

Palm Beach Post

The First District Court of Appeal is siding with Hamilton Downs, a North Florida pari-mutuel facility, in a legal battle with state regulators.

Clean Water Network

Environmentalists are hoping a recent state appellate ruling will make it easier to challenge Florida’s controversial new water quality standards.

Florida Channel

Education advocates ran into a buzz saw of tough questions Tuesday in their fight to revive an adequacy lawsuit based on a 1998 constitutional amendment.   Appellants cited test scores, but a three-judge panel with the First District Court of Appeal appeared skeptical.

Citizens for Strong Schools attorney Jodi Siegel argued Florida’s public schools can’t possibly be meeting the “high-quality” and “uniform” standard voters demanded when testing shows thousands of poor and minority students are lagging behind.