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April 1, 2022

Florida lawmakers are heading back to Tallahassee later this month [April 19 - 22] to redraw the state’s congressional districts. G-O-P legislative leaders explained the goal is to pass a map that is constitutional and has Governor Ron DeSantis’ approval after he vetoed their previous plan. DeSantis and voting rights groups suing over the congressional map are making very different legal arguments about keeping minority access districts. As Valerie Crowder reports, it’s almost a guarantee that the courts will have some say in the matter before the map is finalized.

One of the largest gatherings of election officials in Florida history took place this week outside Orlando. Steve Bousquet was there as voting experts got the surprising news that a federal judge had struck down major portions of an election law approved a year ago.

Students who enter high school in Florida starting in 2023 will have to learn about finances to graduate. The governor has signed a bill mandating a one-semester course in personal financial literacy and money management. Now, Gina Jordan reports school districts are awaiting guidance from the state about how to implement the new curriculum.

Some of the Capital Press Corps’ most experienced reporters share their post-session observations with members of the Capital Tiger Bay Club. Tom Flanigan reports.

It’s been more than a month since Russia began its attack on Ukraine, but for a Russian father and daughter living in Tallahassee it feels much longer. Regan McCarthy has their story.

Another above-normal Atlantic hurricane season could be on the way. AccuWeather forecasters are predicting 16 to 20 named storms this year, with six to eight becoming hurricanes. Three to five of them are projected to be major hurricanes. The forecast also gives a “high chance” of a system forming before the official start of the season on June 1st. Florida Public Radio Meteorologist Megan Borowski explains how this—and forecasts like it—are developed.

In recent years, the old American tradition of the political campaign song had fallen out of favor. But Tom Flanigan says the tradition is back in Florida.