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November 6, 2020

The most important story in the country right now. As of 3pm today, the presidential election had not yet been decided. Ballot counting and recounting is still underway in some states and lawsuits are stacking up in others. But this time, as Ryan Dailey reports, Florida ISN’T the one holding up the process.

Voter turnout across the state was higher this election than in previous presidential election years. Valerie Crowder reports voting was a social affair for many residents in one Northwest Florida county.

President Trump won handily in Florida - with a greater margin of victory than he received four years ago. Most people were expecting a closer election in the state. WUSF news director Mary Shedden asks WUSF political reporter Steve Newborn to explain what the votes say about the Sunshine State's political psyche.

Experts are urging Americans to remain calm as votes in crucial states continue to be counted in a heavily contested presidential election. WMNF’s Daniel Figueroa IV reports there’s no evidence of fraud or tampering, despite President Donald Trump’s premature claim of victory.

The agency in charge of selling Florida as a tourist destination has started a campaign to lure back international visitors. As WUSF’s Bradley George reports, Visit Florida is making plans for travel years from now - and in a post-pandemic world.

Florida’s population grows every year. And the state is trying to come up with ways to meet people’s needs without ruining natural water resources. Robbie Gaffney gives us a snapshot of what issues stakeholders are looking into.

Officials call fall enrollment at schools across the Florida “significantly lower” this year compared to last. One major reason: students aren’t taking the SAT and ACT. Regan McCarthy reports while some states have dropped the requirement amid the coronavirus pandemic, Florida universities still require tests scores before new students can be accepted.