Wansley Walters

Florida Channel

In the coming weeks, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice will be putting the finishing touches on a newly created office where juveniles and their families can raise concerns. That’s just one of the reforms the head of DJJ recently told a group of lawmakers, who had some suggestions of their own to address abuses within the system outlined in a Miami Herald investigative series.

flgov.com

How did children-related issues fare during this past legislative session? While some Florida agency heads say it was a good one, others call it a mixed bag.

Florida Channel

A number of agency leaders honored Republican Senator Nancy Detert Wednesday. The Florida lawmaker is a well-known child advocate in the Florida Legislature.

DJJ's website

Governor Rick Scott has made another interim agency head permanent, after officially naming Christy Daly head of the Florida’s juvenile justice system Thursday.

Daly is no stranger to the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. She’s worked as a deputy Secretary under her predecessor, Wansley Walters, who stepped down in June.

She’s also been the chief of staff and legislative director for DJJ.

MGN Online

Governor Rick Scott has signed close to 70 bills into law this week—most of them Friday. They include a slew of gun-related measures, a controversial voucher expansion bill, and a bill dealing with medical marijuana.

Charlotte's Web

Among the high profile bills the Governor has already signed includes a bill that would legalize a low strain of marijuana known as “Charlotte’s Web” to help treat seizures.

Florida Channel

Governor Rick Scott has approved a measure reforming Florida’s juvenile justice system. He signed the bill into law on the same day he bid farewell to the outgoing Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary and named her temporary replacement.

Before presenting her with a resolution during Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting, Scott said a few words about Wansley Walters, his state Department head of Juvenile Justice, who’s slated to end her role in a few weeks.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

Later this month, the head of Florida’s juvenile justice system will be retiring. In the last of a two-part series, WFSU's Sascha Cordner continues the conversation with outgoing state Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters about her background, her work with the DJJ as well as a her future plans for when she leaves the agency.

Last week, we aired Part 1 of our conversation. Listen below to Part 2, which aired on Friday's Capital Report.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

WFSU’s Sascha Cordner sat down with outgoing Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters, who will be retiring in a month from her role, as first reported by the News Service of Florida. As the agency’s first female head, she’s also one of the longest serving agency heads under Governor Rick Scott. She’s been responsible for a number of innovations, including a civil citation program that has helped reduce the overall juvenile crime-rate.

Hear Part 1 of our conversation below. Stay tuned to next week's Capital Report to hear Part 2.

DJJ

An ongoing fight between Florida’s counties and the state Department of Juvenile Justice is expected to continue during a hearing next week, considering a new formula with which both sides will divvy up the cost of Florida’s juvenile detention centers.

Today, 38 counties are supposed to be responsible for paying about 32 percent of juvenile detention costs. That’s according to Florida Association of Counties Spokeswoman Craigin Mosteller.

myflorida.com

A bill aiming to reform Florida’s juvenile justice system recently won unanimous support during its first Senate hearing. But, some say the measure could still do more.

Fleming Island Republican Senator Rob Bradley’s bill aims to rewrite Florida law that governs juvenile justice to focus on ways to help the state’s delinquent kids. Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary Wansley Walters says it’s the first time in more than a decade there’s been a revision, and she’s on board.

James Madison Institute

As Florida looks to make sure released inmates don’t return to prison, should the Sunshine state look to other states, like Georgia, to learn about their criminal justice reforms?

Housing about 102,000 inmates, Florida’s prison system is the third-largest in the U.S. According to state economists, that number is projected to increase in the next few years. A contributing factor is the number of released inmates going back to prison. Recently, some, including current and former Florida officials, heard from their counterparts in Georgia about efforts there to reduce recidivism…