Sen. Jeff Brandes

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You haven’t done anything wrong, but you’re pulled over anyway. The law enforcement officer asks to search your car. Should that officer be required to tell you about your right to decline the search? Florida lawmakers have started discussions about that very topic for the 2018 legislative session.

Florida Channel

Florida lawmakers are expected to soon take a deeper look into the Miami Herald investigative series, which detailed abuses within the state’s juvenile facilities. A panel of legislators this week gave the head of the Florida’s juvenile justice system a preview of what’s to come.

Leon County Judge Layne Smith

Leon County Judge Layne Smith thinks too many Big Bend motorists are circling the financial drain because their license was suspended or revoked.

Then Rep. Randolph Bracy (D-Ocoee) debating on the House floor.
Mark Foley via FL House website / Florida House of Representatives

Florida lawmakers are cracking down on the synthetic opioid fentanyl. Legislation punishing its possession is heading to the governor.

Lance Cheung

Advocates are hopeful they’ll see legislation implementing tax breaks on solar energy pass the legislature this session. But they’re not happy with different parts of the House and Senate bills.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health via wikimedia commons

A Senate panel is discussing how to re-envision Florida’s affordable housing system. 

DXR via wikimedia commons

A Senate panel is giving the thumbs up to a measure establishing state-wide regulations for ride hailing services like Uber and Lyft.

Mark Foley / Florida House of Representatives

Republican Representative Jason Brodeur of Sanford wants to get rid of a few more speed bumps he thinks are slowing the development of driverless cars.

Voters didn’t hesitate to expand tax breaks for renewable energy, but some smaller counties are raising concerns as the Legislature decides how to implement Amendment 4.

Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg)
State of Florida

State Senator Jeff Brandes, a Republican  from St. Petersburg,  wants to reduce the number Floridians who get their drivers licenses suspended because they can’t pay fines.

James Clarke Ash

House and Senate Republicans say this is the year Florida joins 37 other states in adopting regulations for so-called transportation network companies, like Uber and Lyft.

Tony Vincelli via flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/42957538@N03/

After experiencing the death of his grandparents, a South Florida lawmaker wants to the change how patients are treated at the end of life. 

@pitbull / Twitter

Florida lawmakers are hoping to shed light on a contract between the state’s tourism agency and the rapper Pitbull.  His production company claims compensation is a trade secret.

Republican Senator Jeff Brandes of St. Petersburg won big in August when voters overwhelmingly approved Amendment 4, his solar tax cut ballot measure.

The sponsor of the Legislature’s solar energy tax cutting measure says he’s confident it will pass, even though the August 30 primary is just around the corner.

(L-R) Sen. Brandes (R-St. Petersburg), Rep. Chris Sprowls (R-Palm Harbor) and Jose Gonzalez of AIF.
Florida Channel

State lawmakers and healthcare industry leaders are taking stock in the wake of this year’s legislative session.  The Associated Industries of Florida just wrapped up a healthcare affordability summit.

Hundreds of thousands of Floridians are losing their licenses because they can’t afford their traffic fines. And courthouses across the state are cutting back hours and furloughing employees because of a massive budget deficit. Legislators are promising to solve both problems, but it won’t be easy.

Failure to pay traffic fines or child support. The reasons for suspending a driver’s license in Florida are piling up and Senate transportation chairman Jeff Brandes wants to do something about it.

Florida Departmenty of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles

For a legislator, it’s a chance to help a worthy cause or send a message to the political base. But specialty license plates are flooding the market and Senate Republicans want to put on the brakes.

Uber Preps For State Regulation

Mar 9, 2015
Yellow Car with Uber Plate
Monika Hoinkis

The ride-hailing app, Uber, has been operating in the state for the better part of 2014 despite statewide concerns over safety, insurance coverage and legality. While a patchwork of regulation has begun to develop on the local level,  state lawmakers are eager to settle the issue once and for all.

The most valuable tech start up in the world does not want to be legally defined as a car service alongside taxis and limos.