Sen. Darryl Rouson

Florida Department of Corrections Facebook

Florida prisoners will have new education opportunities under a law signed by Gov. Rick Scott. 

Florida Supreme Court
Urban Tallahassee

A Constitution Revision Commission proposal to extend the retirement age of Florida’s Supreme Court justices from 70 to 75 is moving forward, and may soon be in front of voters. Commissioner Darryl Rouson says he trusts the move won’t negatively affect diversity in the position.

Florida Channel

With no traction in the Florida House, a bill aiming to help those who say they survived abuse at the infamous Dozier school for Boys appears to be dead.

Florida Slavery Memorial Bill Heads To Gov. Scott

Feb 27, 2018
MGN Online

The Florida Senate passed a bill to create a slavery memorial on the state Capitol grounds. Sen. Darryl Rouson (D-St. Petersburg) says he’s glad to see the measure getting attention.

Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Pro Photography Network
RAND Corporation

The Florida Legislature is moving ahead with a plan to provide prisoners with an education. The bill is headed to the Senate floor.

Florida Channel

A bill opening the door to allow survivors of the infamous Dozier School for Boys to be later compensated unanimously passed its first committee Monday. That’s the now-closed North Florida reform school where former wards say they were physically and sexually abused decades ago.

Two CRC Proposals Tackling Felon Voting Rights Pass

Jan 19, 2018
MGN Online

Florida Felons have been fighting for the right to vote for years now, and while a grassroots petition movement within the state has spurred interest in the issue, two proposals in the Constitutional Revisions Commission look to tackle the controversy from another angle.

Getty Images

Despite past failed legislative attempts, a bipartisan pair of lawmakers is vowing to continue their work on criminal justice reform—particularly within Florida’s prison system.

Restek

Momentum is building for an unusual, do-it-yourself special session on medical marijuana, although the legislator behind it admits he faces long odds.

University of South Florida

A bill creating memorials to remember the boys who died and were buried in unmarked graves on the Dozier School for Boys’ grounds is now heading to Governor Rick Scott. It’s part two of what the Florida legislature’s doing to help address the abuses that occurred at the school decades ago.

Holland & Knight's Florida Government Advocacy Team twitter

Last week, the Florida House formally apologized to the former wards of two now-closed reform schools for the abuse they say they suffered. Now, the Florida Senate is now doing the same.

MGN Online

A bill formally apologizing to the victims of the now-closed Dozier School for Boys is now heading to the Senate floor, after passing its last committee Tuesday.

MGN Online

A panel of Florida lawmakers began a discussion this week to consider automatically restoring the civil rights of ex-felons who committed nonviolent crimes.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

Two bills offering a formal apology to former wards who say they were abused in a Panhandle reform school and creates memorials for those buried on the property passed their first House committee Thursday. After hearing some horrific stories, some Florida lawmakers issued apologies of their own.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

The former wards of the now-closed Dozier School for Boys in Marianna are one step closer to receiving a formal apology by the state of Florida. That’s the Florida Panhandle school where alleged abuse occurred for several decades.

Florida Carry Inc. Facebook page

A Stand Your Ground-related bill is now teed up for a vote in the full Florida Senate. But, a bipartisan push to water down the bill Thursday is angering some gun rights groups.

Sen. Darryl Rouson's twitter

A Florida Senator filed a bill Wednesday to get rid of the Electoral College, which was the deciding factor in electing Donald Trump as the next President.

Senate President Joe Negron welcoming new senators.
Nick Evans

The 2017 legislative session doesn’t begin in earnest until next March but lawmakers are wasting no time getting incoming members up to speed.