Seminole tribe

Deck of cards with Ace of Spades on top
Steven Depolo

An attempt to create a new gambling agreement between the state and Seminole Indian Tribe failed last legislative session, but Florida’s legislative leaders say they’d like to see a compact pass this time around.

Some of the most controversial bills of the legislative session are dying as lawmakers rush to complete their work for the 2016 session.

Michal Parzuchowski

In an effort to promote a proposed gaming agreement between Florida and the Seminole Indian Tribe, Gov. Rick Scott and representatives from the tribe met Monday. The group discussed the benefits of the compact, which include more money and more jobs, as well as a chance to retain the jobs the Seminole casinos currently provide.

Ian Murphy

The banked card game portion of the state’s gambling agreement with the Seminole Indian tribe has expired. And by the end of the month, the agreement stipulates the tribe is supposed to stop all card games like Black Jack. But it might not have to.

Let the games continue!

Sen. Rob Bradley (R-Fleming) is pushing for a year extension of an agreement between the Seminole Tribe of Florida  and Florida that gives the Tribe exclusive rights for some games.  

The Seminole Tribe  wants to renew an exclusive gambling contract with the state. The Florida Senate is preparing a plan to extend part of the agreement with the Tribe to allow games such as blackjack at six tribe-owned casinos for another year.

Ian Murphy

Gaming is shaping up to be a big player this session as lawmakers consider what would happen if they don’t renew a portion of the state’s gaming compact with the Seminole tribe.

Seminole Hard Rock Casino

Gambling in Florida takes many forms, whether it’s the state lottery, dog tracks with poker rooms or full-scale resort-casinos. This year, lawmakers tried to create a state gaming commission to regulate all the various options in a more uniform way. At the same time, they tried to invite huge new casinos to Miami. Those measures died, but some policy makers are already planning on how to attack the contentious issue of gambling again, even though the next legislative session is more than half a year away.