presidential search

FSU Presidential Search Committee Approves New Timeline

Jun 20, 2014
presidentialsearch.fsu.edu

The Florida State University Presidential Search Advisory Committee is taking steps to refine its search process. The committee held its first meeting Friday with new search firm Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates.

Students attending Wednesday's presidential search committee meeting.
Nick Evans

It’s no secret Florida State University’s presidential search has put a bitter taste in the mouths of many students, faculty, and alumni.   Several of these stakeholders made their voices heard at Wednesday’s presidential search committee meeting.

Some, like FSU student John Emanuello, followed the procedures, using the public comment time to call for a reset in the presidential search.

“Now’s the time to take a step back and revaluate and reassess how the search has gone and where it should go in the future,” Emanuello says.

Florida State University’s presidential search committee is hiring a new firm to find a leader for the school. The move comes after the presidential search consultant quit amid accusations from students and faculty that the process had been rigged.

Bill Funk resigned as FSU’s search consultant Monday, even after Ed Burr, chairman of the university’s search committee says he tried to get Funk to stay. The search committee will now hire a new firm to lead its presidential search in a move Burr calls a compromise with the faculty and students who have opposed the process:

FSU Presidential Search Consultant Resigns

Jun 9, 2014

Bill Funk, the consultant hired to head the search for Florida State University's next president, has resigned, according to FSU spokespeople. 

Ed Burr, chair of the Presidential Search Advisory Committee, released this statement Monday afternoon:

Florida State University

The Florida State University Faculty Senate declared "no confidence" in FSU Presidential Search Advisory committee consultant Bill Funk at its meeting Wednesday night. The Senate believes strong academic leadership and credentials are key qualities for a president who will push FSU into the top 25 public universities – qualities they believe Funk deems less important than FSU loyalty.

FSU Faculty Senator Michael Buchler says he believes Funk doesn’t have the presidential search committee’s best interests in mind.

As Florida State University continues its search for a new president many faculty and observers are crying foul over the process.

Faculty union president  Jennifer Proffitt says the search committee agreed on getting a president with strong academic credentials, but it is not panning out that way.

“Search committees/search firms set deadlines so that people know when they can apply by and that wasn’t done. And the criteria the search committee voted on in April wasn’t followed and that’s the big concern by the faculty," she says.

Michelle Rehwinkle Vasilinda / facebook.com

Tallahassee State Representative Michelle Rehwinkle-Vasilinda says she’s concerned the press isn’t taking her bid to be Florida State University President seriously. Vasilinda is the second state lawmaker in the pool for FSU’s top job, and she’s taking aim at the front-runner, a powerful state senator with many political ties.

Vasilinda’s resume consists of decades in higher education, the creation of various classes at Florida State and her primary employer Tallahassee Community College—not to mention her work as a lawmaker with strong ties to the local community:

Florida State University has released the names of applicants for its open presidency position. The list is notable for whose resume still isn’t on it—the presumed front runner, Florida state Sen. John Thrasher (R-St. Augustine).

FSU search consultant Bill Funk told the search committee Thrasher had been nominated several times, but only one nomination letter, from former FSU President Sandy D’Alemberte, has been released. Thrasher has said he’ll submit his resume during his June 11 interview.

Florida Senate

State Sen. John Thrasher (R-St. Augustine) says he’s looking forward to addressing the concerns of Florida State University faculty and students when he interviews for the school's top job.

Thrasher has risen to the top of a slim list of candidates in a presidential search process  many on the university’s search committee agree is unusual. The decision to interview Thrasher is controversial because of his political ties and how the search process has gone. The first thing Thrasher will have to address is why he never formally applied for the position.

Florida Senate

Update 7:oo p.m.: Bill Funk has been called the “guru of higher education recruiting” by the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Florida State University has hired him to help find a new president. But Wednesday he told the university’s search committee the task has been made more complicated by the candidacy of Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine. 

“To be in the public with someone who cast such a long shadow over the process, really limited the interest of these individuals,” said Funk.

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