pregnancy discrimination

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Today, there’s no Florida law on the books to protect pregnant women from workplace discrimination. For months, the Florida Supreme Court grappled with that decision, and Thursday, they ruled employers can’t discriminate against pregnant women under the state’s civil rights act. But, one lawmaker says that still needs to be codified in state law.

For more than 30 years, pregnancy has been protected from employer discrimination under federal law. But, in the Sunshine state, it’s a different story.

MGN Online

The Florida Senate approved a slew of measures, teed up some others, and put several measures on hold. They range from an inmate porn ban to a bill stiffening the penalties for hit-and-run drivers.

Flood Insurance Bill

The Florida Senate started off the Session by quickly passing St. Petersburg Republican Senator Jeff Brandes’ Florida Insurance legislation. The measure aims to make it easier for private companies to sell flood insurance.

“Senator Brandes, you are recognized on the bill,” said Senate President Don Gaetz.

Susan Collins

Federal law bans discrimination based on pregnancy, but Florida law is less clear.  But the state Senate appears set to grant civil rights protection to pregnant Floridians.

Three Florida district court cases have wrangled with pregnancy discrimination.  In two, the courts found Florida law provides protection.  But in the most recent case, the court said pregnancy is not protected because it is not explicitly referenced in state statute.  Senator Geraldine Thompson (D-Orlando) says her bill puts the matter to rest by adding pregnancy to the list of protections.

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Bills banning pregnancy discrimination and establishing credit scores for minors sailed through one Florida Senate committee Tuesday. The same committee also passed a measure paving the way for dentists to provide additional services to low-income people without risk of lawsuits.

Sen. Geraldine Thompson's (D-Orlando) bill prohibiting employment discrimination against pregnant women won unanimous approval Tuesday from the Senate Judiciary Committee.  Chairman Tom Lee says the measure is needed because a pregnancy case is pending before the Florida Supreme Court.