NPR Health

Shots - Health News
3:38 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Malaria-Like Disease Follows Lyme's Path In New England

As white-tailed deer have returned to New England in the past century, they've brought with them tick-borne parasites that cause human diseases.
marcinplaza iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 1:07 pm

There's more than deer lurking in the New England woods these days.

Diseases carried by ticks that hitch rides on deer are rising in the Northeast, researchers said Monday at a meeting about tropical diseases.

In particular, babesiosis — a disease that mimics malaria — is catching up with Lyme disease in some communities.

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Shots - Health News
3:22 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Georgia Immigration Law Trips Up Doctors And Nurses

Workers in the Georgia secretary of state's office have fallen behind on licensing applications for nurses.
Jim Burress WABE

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 7:39 am

Hundreds of health care workers in Georgia are losing their licenses to practice because of a problem created by a new immigration law in the state.

The law requires everyone — no matter where they were born — to prove their citizenship or legal residency to renew their professional licenses.

With too few state workers to process the extra paperwork, licenses for doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals are expiring.

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On Aging
12:00 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

How To Start Talking Details With Aging Parents

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later, if you wonder what Olympian Leo Manzano listens to to get fired up or cooled down, you need not wonder any more. We'll find out in a few minutes.

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Shots - Health News
3:29 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Chinese schoolchildren during lessons at a classroom in Hefei, east China's Anhui province, in 2010.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 2:17 pm

In 1979, when Jim Stigler was still a graduate student at the University of Michigan, he went to Japan to research teaching methods and found himself sitting in the back row of a crowded fourth-grade math class.

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Shots - Health News
12:37 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

How Changing Visual Cues Can Affect Attitudes About Weight

Pictures like these helped British researchers gauge people's attitudes about weight.
Courtesy of Martin Tovee

With most Americans fat or fatter, you'd think we'd be lightening up on the anti-fat attitudes.

Alas, no. Even doctors often think their overweight patients are weak-willed.

But changing negative attitudes about body size might be as simple as changing what you see. When women in England were shown photos of plus-sized women in neutral gray leotards, they became more tolerant.

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