NPR Health

Goats and Soda
5:59 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Ebola Is Changing Course In Liberia. Will The U.S. Military Adapt?

A helicopter's eye view of a new ETU, funded by USAID and built by Save the Children.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 6:31 pm

The Ebola outbreak started in rural areas, but by June it had reached Liberia's capital, Monrovia.

By August, the number of people contracting the Ebola virus in the country was doubling every week. The Liberian government and aid workers begged for help.

Enter the U.S. military, who along with other U.S. agencies had a clear plan in mid-September to build more Ebola treatment units, or ETUs. At least one would be built in the major town of each of Liberia's 15 counties. That way, sick patients in those counties wouldn't bring more Ebola to the capital.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:16 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Administration Warns Employers: Don't Dump Sick Workers From Plans

Agent Illustrateur Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 7:34 pm

As employers try to minimize expenses under the health law, the Obama administration has warned them against paying high-cost workers to leave the company medical plan and buy coverage elsewhere.

Such a move would unlawfully discriminate against employees based on their health status, three federal agencies said in a bulletin issued in early November.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:50 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Drugged Marshmallows Can Keep Urban Raccoons From Spreading Disease

Does this little guy look familiar? Clean up his feces in your yard to avoid infection from his parasites.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 7:51 pm

The masked garbage crusaders of the night can be more than just a nuisance. Raccoons also can be bad news for human health, carrying diseases such as rabies and roundworms.

And because raccoons have happily colonized cities and suburbs, a particular roundworm called Baylisascaris procyonis that the critters often carry can make its way into humans. The parasite's eggs are carried in raccoon poop.

When ingested, the eggs release the worm, which can burrow into the eyes and brain causing blindness or even death, in rare cases.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:16 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Treatment For HIV Runs Low In U.S., Despite Diagnosis

A pharmacist pours Truvada pills, an HIV treatment, back into the bottle at Jack's Pharmacy in San Anselmo, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 2:52 pm

About two-thirds of Americans who are infected with the virus that causes AIDS aren't getting treated for it.

The finding comes from an analysis just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showing that more needs to be done to make sure people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus get proper treatment.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:26 am
Tue November 25, 2014

How Can Vultures Eat Rotten Roadkill And Survive?

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 6:31 pm

You might wonder why 48 million Americans get food poisoning every year, yet there are some animals that seem to be immune from even the nastiest germs.

We're talking here about vultures, which feast on rotting flesh that is chockablock with bacteria that would be deadly to human beings. In fact, vultures have a strong preference for that kind of food.

Read more

Pages