medicaid expansion

hhs.gov

The federal government says non-Medicaid expansion states could be doing more to help people with substance abuse and mental health disorders. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 300,000 uninsured Floridians with such disorders could be treated if Florida expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

LHatter / WFSU News

The fight over the future of Healthcare in Florida is not over, despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling reaffirming the Affordable Care Act. The Court has upheld subsidies for nearly nine million Americans who purchased health insurance on the federal government’s insurance exchange. Some hope the court’s latest ruling could push states like Florida, to fully implement the law.

Medicaid expansion, the issue that caused this week’s special session, has flat lined. Now that the House and Senate have agreed to disagree, it’s up to the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether 1.8 million Floridians go without health insurance.

House Speaker Steve Crisfaulli says the Senate’s Medicaid Expansion plan has too many problems, and probably won’t pass his chamber. Instead, he wants to focus on a shortfall in a critical hospital funding program.Crisafulli’s comments come as the legislature reconvenes to address a new budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

Senate President Andy Gardiner talks to reporters.
The Florida Channel

Florida lawmakers return to Tallahassee next week, a month after a fight over healthcare funding caused an abrupt end to the regular legislative session. Their mission: get a state budget in place before the start of the July 1 fiscal year. But the fight over Medicaid is still smoldering and lawmakers could be adding more fuel to the fire with other health-related proposals slated for the agenda.

Commission on Healthcare and Hospital Funding
Agency For Healthcare Administration

Governor Rick Scott’s hospital finance group and the state’s healthcare agency have released the names of hospitals that haven’t responded to the group’s requests for information. The move comes amid an increasingly bitter debate over the future of healthcare funding in Florida.

Senate President Andy Gardiner during a press conference pushing the Senate's "FHIX" proposal--a privatized version of Medicaid expansion.
Keta Browning / WFSU News

Chances the Legislature will break a stalemate over health care in next week’s special session appear remote. Senate President Andy Gardiner, an Orlando Republican, has a new proposal to provide insurance to 800,000 Floridians, but the governor and House speaker oppose it.

Florida is losing more than half of a critical hospital funding program but lawmakers say they’re grateful to at least have a number they can start building a budget around. Meanwhile the legislature continues to grapple with how to fill substantial budget hole.

Tallahassee Memorial Hospital is a private hospital, but serves as the region's safety net system.
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital / TMH

Governor Rick Scott is keeping up his criticism of the federal government as the state braces for all or a partial loss of a $2 billion healthcare program. As Scott has bashed the federal government over the low-income pool, he’s also taken aim at hospitals—and is moving ahead with a workgroup to study their finances.

Governor Rick Scott has selected nine people to serve on his hospital funding commission.  The formation of the groups as all or part of a major federal healthcare funding program expires next month.

Shands Jacksonville says losing LIP funds could shut it down.
University of Florida

Governor Rick Scott’s newly-formed hospital workgroup is quickly becoming a hot ticket. Several lawmakers are volunteering to serve on the panel that will examine hospital funding.

--

Senate President Andy Gardiner during a press conference pushing the Senate's "FHIX" proposal--a privatized version of Medicaid expansion.
Keta Browning / WFSU News

The legislative graveyard is littered with dead bills, but some issues are too stubborn to go down without a fight. One of them is Medicaid Expansion. It’s is down, but some lawmakers and healthcare advocates are hoping to get it to move from the zombie column, into the land of the living.  A lawsuit, coupled with the fate of Florida’s budget—may depend on it.

Governor Rick Scott speaks with reporters following a meeting with HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell in Washington, D.C.
Tampa Bay Tines

Florida Governor Rick says he didn’t get an answer on whether the federal government would renew a $2 billion program reimbursing hospitals for uncompensated care. The fate of the Low-Income pool is at the center of a budget impasse in the state.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi says Medicaid and the Low Income Pool funds should be separated.
The Florida Channel

Governor Rick Scott is going to Washington D.C. to lobby for the renewal of federal funds that reimburse hospitals for uncompensated care. But at the same time, he’s suing the federal government over the same program.

Gov. Rick Scott is suing the federal government over Low-Income Pool funding.
Governor Rick Scott

Florida is getting support from other states in its lawsuit against the federal government over healthcare funding. There are about nine other states that get supplemental Medicaid funding, called the Low-Income Pool and Texas and Kansas are among them.

House Speaker Steve Crisafulli (l) speaks to Senate President Andy Gardiner prior to the legislative session.
D.A. Robin / WFSU-FM

The calamitous ending of the 2015 legislative session is making state history books. The 60-day lawmaking period didn’t start off well—and ended in disaster, lawsuits and charges of backstabbing. Lynn Hatter puts it to music.

Gov. Rick Scott is suing the federal government over Low-Income Pool funding.
Governor Rick Scott

Governor Rick Scott is following through on a promise to examine the finances of Florida’s public hospitals.  The move comes as an impasse between the legislative chambers deepens.

Tampa Bay Times

The stalemate between Florida’s Republican leaders is getting worse. A day after the House abruptly adjourned, the Senate says it may sue unless Representatives come back. Still, not everyone believes the abrupt end of the session is a bad thing.

In happier times: House Speaker Steve Crisafulli (l) and Sen. President Andy Gardiner (r).
Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

The icy relationship between the House and Senate over healthcare funding may be thawing. The House and Senate have started negotiations on an alternative way to fund hospitals if a federal program expires as scheduled.

Shands Jacksonville says losing LIP funds could shut it down.
University of Florida

Governor Rick Scott says if the legislature can’t get an answer on healthcare funding, he’ll call a special session to put a continuation budget in place. That would carry the state through the upcoming fiscal year, which begins the first of July. But in the meantime, some hospitals could be forced to shut down as the legislative standoff on healthcare funding continues.

House Speaker Steve Crisafulli talks to reporters after the House Republican caucus' closed-door meeting.
The Florida Channel

Florida House leaders are being criticized for a closed-door meeting of Republican lawmakers to talk about healthcare issues.

Florida’s Healthcare Agency has formally submitted a plan to extend a $2 billion program that reimburses hospitals treating low-income patients. The state has submitted the Senate’s plan reforming the low-income pool to the federal government.

Senate President Andy Gardiner during a press conference pushing the Senate's "FHIX" proposal--a privatized version of Medicaid expansion.
Keta Browning / WFSU News

As the fog surrounding healthcare in Florida thickens, some observers say there’s a way out of the storm…if lawmakers can ever make it there.  Here's a look at some of the possibilities for a resolution to the legislature’s healthcare funding impasse.

Matthew Seeger

Representative Richard Corcoran may be putting his foot in his mouth after calling proponents of Medicaid expansion “Gucci-loafing, shoe-wearing special interests.” Medical professionals from South Florida marched heel-toe to the capitol, and as Matthew Seeger reports, they’re not going to buckle to legislative tongue-lashing.

Gov. Rick Scott is suing the federal government over Low-Income Pool funding.
Governor Rick Scott

Governor Rick Scott says he’s suing the federal government over a move that links a critical hospital funding program to a Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. The Governor says that amounts to coercion.

Pages