Medicaid

Regan McCarthy

President Donald Trump’s plan to slash billions of dollars from Medicaid would hit small town America hardest, especially in Florida, according to a new Georgetown study.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) says it's time for Florida to have an independent redistricting commission.
Nick Evans

Poor Floridians may see less access to medical care. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, said the state is turning down billions of dollars in federal funding for health care this year because it is not expanding Medicaid. Florida lawmakers are also planning to cut Medicaid and hospital funding.

flickr.com/Creative Commons / taxcredits.net

The Florida House has unveiled plans to overhaul the state’s Medicaid program. The proposal includes new premiums and work requirements. But longtime observers say the program is stingy as-is, and they’re questioning whether the House plan is even feasible.

Nick Evans

Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida members are worried federal and state lawmakers will reduce health care funding for low income Floridians.

Florida’s long-term care industry group says the state’s Medicaid Managed Care system isn’t quite working for it. And it wants long term care to be carved out of the system. The state long-term care association brought its complaints to a state healthcare committee Tuesday.

Healthcarelist.com

Florida lawmakers are poised to take up healthcare access and affordability issues, and that includes reviving pieces of a failed state healthcare reform plan. Ambulatory care centers, recovery care centers and direct primary care could get a second look.

Protestors accuse Tallahassee Memorial Hospital of limiting access for Medicaid patients. The hospital says more than half its clients are Medicaid or charity care.
LHatter / WFSU News

Tallahassee cardiologist Ed Holifield is accusing Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare of artificially limiting the number Medicaid patients it serves. A small protest took place outside the hospital Tuesday.

A map representing the 13 regions for Medicaid Managed Care
Agency For Healthcare Administration

When Florida lawmakers new and old arrive for the annual lawmaking session they’ll be faced with a $25 billion issue: Medicaid. The state’s health insurance program for low-income Floridians just keeps getting bigger, despite continued efforts to control costs.

WUSF News

Nursing homes are gearing up to fight a plan that could result in what they say are widely varied Medicaid reimbursement rates. Its part of a legislative push for efficiency, but the move is worrying providers in the $4.8 billion program.

A decade long lawsuit against Florida’s Medicaid program has come to a close. Florida and organizations representing the state’s dentists and pediatricians, have reached a settlement deal  that could lead to kids having more access to healthcare in the program.

Daniel Oines / flickr.com

Changes could soon be on the way when it comes to how the state administers dental services in its Medicaid Managed Care program.  Dental care could be re-established as an independent service in the state’s Medicaid program.

taxcredits.net

The Florida legislature is working to answer a big question—how to absorb a $400 million hit to its healthcare budget. Lawmakers rolled out a plan Thursday to account for a shrinking pool of federal healthcare dollars.

Healthcarelist.com

Florida lawmakers are bracing for budget holes despite figures showing the state could end up with another year of surplus.  The cost driver: healthcare.

Healthcare concerns, more specifically cost problems—are starting to take over conversations at the capital.

Experts are warning the ranks of the uninsured in Florida could skyrocket if the Legislature and the U.S. Supreme Court create the perfect storm.

After a flurry of court hearings taking aim at the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the agency must now rewrite some of their rules on how disability funding is allocated. A workshop held today on the iBudget is just one small step in a much longer narrative.

Keta Browning / WFSU News

Florida’s League of Women Voters swarmed the Capitol on Wednesday to back the senate’s new healthcare expansion plan. Tuesday, the senate’s Health Policy Committee unanimously passed a bill that extends health insurance to more than 800,000 low income Floridians.

Capital Report: 03-04-2015

Mar 4, 2015

With a potential billion-dollar budget hole looming, the Florida Senate is starting to consider whether and how to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid. Lynn Hatter reports there are at least two proposed bills floating around the chamber, and lawmakers are also raising the possibility of resurrecting the original plan, dubbed “Negron-Care”.

Capital Report: 03-03-2015

Mar 3, 2015

Tom Flanigan gives an overview of Governor Rick Scott’s Fifth State of the State address and the two responses from the Legislature’s Democratic leaders.

The Florida Senate is preparing to start debate over expanding Medicaid in Florida. Lynn Hatter reports the issue has been a major contention point between the House and Senate for the past three years.

taxcredits.net

  No matter which side of the political fence you’re on, health coverage is a big deal. Millions of Floridians aren’t able to afford even the most basic procedures, medications and treatments they need to stay healthy. The prospects for bringing coverage aren’t anything to sneeze at, either.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell
Juan Manuel Herrera / OAS/flickr.com

Governor Rick Scott says he’s disappointed the federal government won’t extend a billion-dollar program to reimburse hospitals that treat low-income Floridians. But the move by the feds to stop the program is not unexpected.

Doctors, Dentists React To Medicaid Ruling

Jan 5, 2015

Florida healthcare providers and advocates recently won a lengthy court battle against the state Medicaid’s program. 

Florida doctors and dentists argued Medicaid was shortchanging them on reimbursement rates. U.S. appellate Judge Adalberto Jordan agreed.

Florida Dental Association President Richard Stevenson says low reimbursement was a major factor for dentists in the state refusing to accept Medicaid patients.  Stevenson says he is looking forward to legislators providing enough funds to better care for the state’s underserved and vulnerable populations.

After nearly a decade of legal battling, a federal judge this week found widespread problems in the way Florida's Medicaid program has provided health care to children.

Judge Adalberto Jordan, in a 153-page decision, said Florida's history of low reimbursement payments to doctors led to a lack of access to care for many children in Medicaid. He also pointed to problems with issues such as children being improperly terminated from the program, inadequate efforts to sign up children for coverage and a lack of available dental care.

Capital Report: 12-12-2014

Dec 15, 2014

Recent shootings around the country have left many reexamining police departments and policies. But Regan McCarthy reports its also led to a renewed focus on personal protection with increased gun sales and a legislative proposal to allow guns on college campuses.

Capital Report: 09-12-2014

Sep 12, 2014

Florida recently finished rolling out a new way of providing care to more than 3.5 million low-income Floridians. Nearly all of them, adults as well as children—are now enrolled in managed care plans. The state agency that runs Medicaid—the system that pays for it all, recently released a series of comments from various players in the industry praising the rollout. But as Lynn Hatter reports, some groups say the new system is plagued with problems, new and old.

The 1999 Olmstead v. L.C. decision says unnecessarily segregating people in mental hospitals, nursing homes and other institutions amounts to discrimination. Advocates for the mentally ill, older people and the disabled cite the ruling in arguing for home and community-based care.

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