Marissa Alexander

Florida Channel

A bill making changes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law is now headed to the Senate floor, after passing its last committee Thursday. One of its ardent supporters is Marissa Alexander—the Jacksonville woman who faced 60 years in prison for firing a warning shot in an alleged domestic dispute.

MGN Online

Some Florida lawmakers are hoping to revive an effort that could change the role of State Attorneys prosecuting a “Stand Your Ground” case. And, some prosecutors are also against another bill giving judges more discretion in handing out mandatory 10-20-Life sentences.

The Jacksonville mother once sentenced to 20 years for shooting into a wall will now serve 65 days in county jail and two years under house arrest under a new plea agreement.
 

Marissa Alexander agreed to take a plea deal Monday afternoon. 

She pleaded guilty to three counts of aggravated assault and because she has already served time, she'll only spend 65 more days behind bars.

MGN Online

Governor Rick Scott has signed close to 70 bills into law this week—most of them Friday. They include a slew of gun-related measures, a controversial voucher expansion bill, and a bill dealing with medical marijuana.

Charlotte's Web

Among the high profile bills the Governor has already signed includes a bill that would legalize a low strain of marijuana known as “Charlotte’s Web” to help treat seizures.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

In just a few months, the Jacksonville woman who inspired the so-called “Warning Shot” bill is expected to have another trial. Several activist groups rallied at the Capitol Thursday, urging Governor Rick Scott to get rid of the lead State Attorney who’s seeking a 60-year prison term in the re-trial of Marissa Alexander.

AP Photo

The so-called “Warning Shot” bill is heading to the Governor’s desk, after the Senate passed the measure Thursday. But, debate grew heated as some Democrats tried—and failed—to amend the bill.

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

A bill allowing someone to threaten to use force in a situation where they feel threatened without fear of prosecution is expected to be discussed on the Senate Floor this week.  And, the so-called “warning shot” bill that was modified at each committee stop may go through another change on the floor.

MGN Online

A measure inspired by the story of a Jacksonville woman who received a lengthy prison term for firing a warning shot unanimously cleared another Senate hurdle Tuesday. It’s the second time around for the so-called “Warning Shot” bill in that same committee.

Last month, the bill got held up after undergoing multiple changes and time ran out in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. So, on the first day of the 2014 Legislative Session, Baker Republican Senator Greg Evers got a second chance to vet his bill.

MGN Online

Over the next few weeks, Florida lawmakers are slated to take up a series of gun-related measures, from fixes to Florida’s Stand Your Ground law to enhancing penalties for insurers who discriminate against gun-owners. But, while some bills appear to be moving quickly through the Legislature, others appear to be stalled in the legislative process.

"Right To Be A Kid" Bill

Florida Channel

A bill aimed at allowing someone to show a gun or fire a warning shot in self-defense without fear of prosecution is now heading to the House floor. It’s a bill inspired by a Jacksonville woman who fired a warning shot in an alleged domestic violence dispute and received a lengthy prison term.

MGN Online

A bill got held up that would amend the state’s Stand Your Ground law, after the measure ran into problems during a Senate hearing Tuesday.

The intent of the so-called “Warning Shot” bill is to fix the unintended consequences of Florida’s 10-20-Life Law. This year’s legislation is inspired by Marissa Alexander, a Jacksonville woman who fired a warning shot during an alleged domestic dispute and received a 20-year-prison sentence. During her initial trial, she claimed Stand Your Ground, but a judge said it didn’t apply.

Florida Department of Corrections

A Jacksonville woman serving a 20-year prison sentence for trying to scare her husband with a gunshot is getting a new trial. The Marisa Alexander case has made national headlines as it stokes the debate over Florida’s mandatory-minimum-sentence laws.

A South Florida lawmaker’s request to pardon a Jacksonville woman who a judge ruled did not qualify for a “Stand Your Ground” defense is getting a muted response.  Cabinet members say it’s too soon to pardon Marissa Alexander.

Dwight Bullard Headshot
Florida Senate

A Democratic state senator is calling for state officials to pardon a Jacksonville woman sentenced to 20 years in prison for firing a gun in her husband’s house. Miami Senator Dwight Bullard says Marissa Alexander’s case highlights the need to repeal the state’s Stand Your Ground law.