invasive species

Buzzle.com

Florida is a prime breeding ground for invasive species that can threaten the state’s ecology and economy. For every lionfish or Burmese python that’s captured, thousands remain. And the sheer scope of the problem is pushing some lawmakers to ask how much of a difference state funding actually makes.

sama093 via flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sama093/

Florida’s invasive species problem can be daunting, with real implications for the state’s ecology and economy. The breadth of the issue is spurring some lawmakers to ask if state funding makes a difference.

PETA Criticizes Python Challenge

Jan 6, 2016
Buzzle.com

Since 2013, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission has involved the public in fighting the invasive Burmese python. But the animal rights group PETA is criticizing the effort.

tegu
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Florida wildlife officials are working to eradicate invasive lizards that can grow up to 4 feet long and have been seen eating alligator eggs. Tegus have been spotted recently in Hillsborough, Miami-Dade and Polk counties.

LHatter / WFSUNews

The Florida Keys boasts a variety of flora and fauna, and tourists flock to the region to soak up the sun and enjoy the climate. The area has tried hard to protect its vanishing native wildlife in recent years, and repel the invaders who could harm the natural balance. But not all invasive species are of the ‘exotic’ variety.

Lionfish Import, Sale Ban Advances In Florida Senate

Mar 20, 2014
Lionfish
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

In the ongoing battle against a non-native fish invading state waters, a Senate committee passed a bill today that prohibits lionfish from being imported or raised in Florida. Fish sellers say they support the general idea of the ban but still have some reservations.

Tanks full of colorful fish line the walls of Carol’s Critters pet shop in Tallahassee, where Jerry Peterson holds the title of Fish Manager. He stops next to a 75-gallon tank. This, he says, is where the lionfish would be if they were in stock.

Scott Markowitz

The federal government asked a judge Tuesday to dismiss a lawsuit seeking to overturn a nationwide trade ban on four giant snake species—including snakes invading the Florida Everglades. The action comes amidst calls for the feds to ban five additional snake species.