higher education reform

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RAND Corporation

One North Florida community college is getting federal funds to educate incarcerated students.

Florida House

House Speaker Will Weatherford is vowing to change Florida’s public higher education system. In a forum sponsored by the Orlando Sentinel Tuesday, the House Speaker says the state’s higher education system can’t continue on the same path its on now.

Weatherford promised changes in how Florida’s public universities do business. He spoke about the need to keep tuition rates low, but also pushed for letting some of the universities, such as the University of Florida and Florida State University, break free of the state’s tuition caps:

The House Higher Education Committee has released its plan to further revamp the state’s college and university system. Lynn Hatter reports the proposal would expand the power of the board that oversees the state’s 11 public universities—and make it harder for the colleges to establish bachelor’s degree programs.

Lawmakers are continuing their review of higher education and talking with more of the state university presidents. The talks are happening in the House Higher Education Committee, where, as Lynn Hatter reports, differences between the schools are starting to emerge, especially when it comes to issues like tuition increases for STEM degrees. 

State Universities say they have no problem with the governor’s request to see more science and technology degrees produced. But they also note that they need more money to do it. Lynn Hatter reports Representatives from Florida’s 11 public universities spoke before a highly anticipated House Education Committee where recommendations- or legislation—could be produced.

State Universities say they have no problem with the governor’s request to see more science and technology degrees produced. But they also note that they need more money to do it. Lynn Hatter reports Representatives from Florida’s 11 public universities spoke before a highly anticipated House Education Committee where recommendations- or legislation—could be produced.

Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon says creating a balanced state budget, drawing new district maps and reforming  higher education are the big three items he expects to be the focus of Florida’s legislative session. Regan McCarthy reports Speaker Cannon says he expects this session to be just as open, transparent and respectful as last session.

 

The 2012 legislative session kicks off Tuesday in Tallahassee and near the top of the to-do list is the beginning of a conversation on higher education reform. For months, Governor Rick Scott has talked about changing the way public universities are funded, and how faculty are paid and evaluated. Lynn Hatter reports while it may take years for the complete agenda to be fulfilled, the foundation will be laid this year.