Florida Medicaid

MGN Online

More Floridians could lose their health insurance under legislation being considered by the U.S. Senate. That includes the poor, the disabled and military veterans.

Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare

Both the Florida House and Senate budget versions propose cuts to the state’s already-low Medicaid payments to health care providers. Safety net hospitals, such as Tallahassee Memorial, claim that’s bad news, not only for Medicaid patients, but also for all state taxpayers.

Sarah Mueller

Gov. Rick Scott met Monday with members of the Safety Net Alliance of Florida to discuss hospital funding. Hospitals have said doctors will leave the state and the poor may not get care if proposed budget cuts become permanent.

The Florida House and Senate are planning big cuts to Florida hospitals and those groups say it will hurt medical care access for the poor and disabled.

Mayor Andrew Gillum
Nick Evans

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum says Gov. Rick Scott should be careful asking the federal government for Medicaid block grants. The gubernatorial candidate said the city helps support local hospitals and Leon County helps fund local public health services.

A map representing the 13 regions for Medicaid Managed Care
Agency For Healthcare Administration

Florida is asking for extraordinary power to revamp its Medicaid program. It’s prompting alarms from health advocacy organizations and policy analysts because it could cut off access to health care for millions of Floridians. They also complain it’s being done without stakeholder input.

Florida is asking the federal government to cap its funding to the state’s Medicaid program. Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Republican lawmakers say that will mean more flexibility to provide quality healthcare at an affordable cost. But critics point to welfare reform and say fewer people will get health care.

In 2011, the Florida legislature passed a measure to convert Medicaid insurance into a managed care system. But Republican lawmakers now want to take the program away from “big businesses” and change it into a block grant system. But Medicaid providers said if that happens low income families will lose access to health care.

Nick Evans

Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida members are worried federal and state lawmakers will reduce health care funding for low income Floridians.

Scott headshot
Governor Scott's Office

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has been talking up the Republican Congress’ plans for the Affordable Care Act or ObamaCare. But while he’s in Washington D.C. meeting with President Donald Trump’s administration, his public comments are being criticized at home.

Kaiser Family Foundation / kff.org

Top Florida Republican lawmakers are heading to Washington D.C. soon to discuss potential healthcare changes with their Congressional counterparts. They want President Donald Trump’s administration to blockgrant Medicaid funding. But some Floridians worry the sick and the poor will lose their health insurance.

Congressman Matt Gaetz, R-FL, said he wants to turn full control of the Medicaid health insurance over to Florida and the other states. It’s part of Congress’ ongoing debate about repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. But Gaetz offered few details.

A map representing the 13 regions for Medicaid Managed Care
Agency For Healthcare Administration

When Florida lawmakers new and old arrive for the annual lawmaking session they’ll be faced with a $25 billion issue: Medicaid. The state’s health insurance program for low-income Floridians just keeps getting bigger, despite continued efforts to control costs.

A year and a half ago, Florida lawmakers had an idea: the state may be able to save money and get a handle on the rising costs of Medicaid, if it stopped writing checks every time a bill came in. That’s called a fee-for-service model, and for years, Florida’s Medicaid program has operated on that system. But at a cost of around $22 billion, Medicaid has also grown to be the state’s single largest spending item.

The Federal Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services Monday signed off on the first part of a plan that will steer Florida on a path toward Medicaid managed care.

Primary care physicians across the nation and in Florida are set to get more money for treating low-income patients on Medicaid as part of the federal healthcare overhaul law, but even though the increases went into effect at the first of the year, that doesn’t mean those payments will start flowing immediately.

The Florida Dental Association has released a “white paper” on access and the impact of dentistry in Florida. The study says 70-percent of Floridians have no problems finding dentists to care for their needs. But Lynn Hatter reports for the people who can’t find dental care, the greatest gap is in the state’s Medicaid program, and the children who are covered by it.