Environment

State News
5:00 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

'The Cost Of Water Is Going To Go Up': Central Fla. Finding Alternatives To Groundwater

Jessica Palombo WFSU News

Central Florida planners are grappling with a challenge: There’s not enough water for the people expected to live in the area 20 years from now. That realization has prompted unprecedented collaboration between local governments, private utilities and state agencies as they search for more water.

In an October legislative committee meeting, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam gave lawmakers an alarming-sounding statistic about water in Central Florida: “In the next 20 years they’ve got to find another 200 million gallons per day to support a high quality of life.”

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Environment
12:00 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Floating Photographers Capture The Soul Of The Apalachicola River

In late November, Earl Morrogh, David Moynahan and Kris Smith embarked on a five day, 100-mile journey along the entire length of the Apalachicola River.
David Moynahan David Moynahan Photography

Last summer, politicians and citizens crowded a U.S. Senate panel hearing in Apalachicola to demand action on dwindling water flows from Georgia to the Apalachicola river basin. But, some river enthusiasts say Florida’s focus on the lack of water from its northern neighbor is narrow and shortsighted.

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Environment
4:42 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

The Everglades: A 30-Year Work In Progress

A map highlighting South Florida's hydrology
LHatter WFSU News

More than 100 years ago, Florida’s Everglades covered the southern tip of the state, starting at Lake Okeechobee. Today, most of the system has been carved away to make room for growth in the Orlando and Miami markets.  One of the biggest plugs in the system is the Tamiami Trail, a road that acts as a dam, and cuts diagonally across the Everglades from Tampa to Miami. Efforts are now underway to make part of the trail a series of bridges, a project South Florida Water Management Assistant Director Ernie Barnett says would, in his words, “pull the plug in the bathtub”. 

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WFSU Local
3:54 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

DEP Biologist Says Toxins Present In Lake Lafayette Algae Bloom

Algae bloom in Lake Lafayette
Kathleen Haughney

An algae bloom in Tallahassee’s Lake Lafayette is toxic, say state biologists.

The algae bloom in Lake Lafayette has infested the fishing fingers on the west side of the lake, near where it backs up to the Piney-Z neighborhood. Florida Fish and Wildlife officials are putting the blame on excess fertilizer runoff generated by the neighborhood’s hundreds of homes.

According to the Department of Environmental Protection, which tests algae, the bloom is now giving off a toxin called microcystin at a rate DEP biologist David Whiting says may trigger health advisories:

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WFSU Local
5:25 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Algae Bloom In Tallahassee's Lake Lafayette

Blue-green algae at Lake Lafayette, PineyZ Plantation
LHatter WFSU News

For most of the summer and into the fall, a number of Florida water bodies have experienced algae blooms. One popular Tallahassee lake is now experiencing a bloom, and one state official points to a nearby neighborhood as a possible cause.

Tallahassee’s Lake Lafayette is a popular fishing and walking spot. It’s actually three lakes, broken up by a series of dams. The portion of the lake experiencing the algae bloom is the section that backs up to Conner Boulevard, in the Piney Z Plantation community.

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