Environment & Planning

Kate Payne via WFSU

Southside Tallahassee residents are still worried about a proposal to build a new road through their neighborhoods. If city and county officials approve it, the street would be part of the Airport Gateway plan. A recent public meeting on the issue drew dozens of residents.

Kate Payne via WFSU

Florida lawmakers and Governor Scott are $50 million apart when it comes to funding the state’s signature land buying program. But whether it’s 50 million or 100 million, the state has backed out of such proposals before, zeroing out funding for Florida Forever three years in a row. Meanwhile millions of acres of land could be at risk of development.

Kate Payne via WFSU

Florida lawmakers are advancing a plan to allocate $100 million a year to the land buying program Florida Forever. Last year the legislature zeroed out its funding.

Kimley Horn / http://www.crtpa.org/files/125489997.pdf

The Five Points intersection in Midtown Tallahassee is a source of congestion and confusion for drivers. Now a local transit board is working on improving the block where 7th Avenue, Thomasville and Meridian Roads meet.

Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency / http://www.crtpa.org/files/125489996.pdf

City of Tallahassee officials are urging residents to stay involved in plans to redesign Southside streets. Local government agencies are studying possible improvements for Orange Avenue, Lake Bradford and Springhill Roads, and they want residents to know the plans are still in the conceptual stages.

Federal Highway Administration / http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/photos/75957

Every session, Florida lawmakers fight over funding for a river, storm water system or sewage plant in their district. But an environmentalist wants to change that process.

Florida Memory / https://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/35306

From rivers to railroads to highways, the destiny of many Florida cities is tied to local infrastructure. Small neighborhoods and whole towns can live and die by the construction of interstate exits. But public historians say there are ways to balance public access and preservation.