drones

A drone liability bill passed its second committee Tuesday.
Nick Evans

A Senate panel took up new drone legislation Tuesday.  The measure aims at protecting Floridians from injury or property damage, but it’s moving forward without a controversial form of liability.

A drone liability bill passed its second committee Tuesday.
Nick Evans

Last year state lawmakers placed privacy restrictions on the use of drones, and this year they are pushing for liability in the event of personal injury or property damage.  Miami Republican Senator Miguel Diaz De La Portilla believes with more operators there’s greater danger.

Drones are expected jobs and economic activity in Florida
ackab1

A Central Florida Senator is pushing a bill that would limit use of photographic drones by convicted sexual predators.

Dozens of new laws take effect Wednesday, despite a session that came to a screeching halt over health care reform. Cable and cell phone subscribers will get a tax break, voters will be able to register online and drone operators could be facing lawsuits.

www.gnlawpc.com

The subject of drones attracted a lot of attention during this year’s Florida Legislative Session.  The devices are also the subject of a new Tallahassee Community College program that sees the technology as a huge jobs creator.

Michael MK Khor, via Flickr

Last week, Governor Rick Scott approved new restrictions for drones, but the question of how drones clash with the first amendment hovers over the heads of Floridians.

BBC

Drones have become an ambitious new frontier, finding applications in the private and public sectors. But Florida lawmakers are still trying to stay ahead of curve by limiting the use of the flying technology.

BBC

Privacy advocates scored a victory Tuesday when a House panel agreed to reign in the roving eye of pilotless drones. A bill by Republican Representative Larry Metz of Yalaha passed the Civil Justice Subcommittee.

Charles Lockwood's drone.
Nick Evans

Drones.  They’re getting cheaper and hobbyist pilots are finding more and more ways to use them.  Many see huge commercial potential, but state lawmakers are just as concerned about invasion of privacy