Apalachicola Bay

Florida's "water war" with Georgia is not over. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that more legal briefs will be filed in the case, including allowing Florida to contest a special master's report that recommended a ruling in Georgia's favor. If the full amount of time is taken to file the briefs, it could extend a decision by the nation's highest court into late June.

A shrimp boat heads out into the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

With the U.S. Supreme Court expected later this week to review a recommendation that would deny Florida relief in its decades-old water dispute with Georgia, Attorney General Pam Bondi said Tuesday the case is not over yet.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

North Florida Congressman Neal Dunn wants to throw out a federal plan that would reduce freshwater flowing into the struggling Apalachicola Bay. The move comes after a Supreme Court-appointed lawyer ruled against the state in the decades-long water war with Georgia. The Court has not yet made a final ruling. But Dunn and his colleagues are going back to the legislative drawing board to challenge the Army Corps of Engineers.

A view from the docks in the Apalachicola Bay.
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master’s ruling favoring Georgia in a water fight impacting the Apalachicola Bay is being sent to the U.S. Supreme Court. Now two of Florida’s U.S. representatives are trying to hammer out another solution that could address Apalachicola’s problems.

Boats rest on a dock in the Apalachicola Bay
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

A special master is recommending the U.S. Supreme Court rule against Florida in a decades-long fight over water use. The move is a big blow to the Big Bend’s Apalachicola Bay, which depends on water from the system.

Kevin Cavanaugh via Smithsonian Institute / http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fewer-freezes-let-floridas-mangroves-move-north-180948075/

Mangroves are quintessentially tropical and take root along the coast of the Everglades and the Keys where they are home to colorful fish and crabs. But these plants are not marooned in South Florida anymore. WFSU went searching for mangroves along the state’s Gulf Coast.

fishing boats
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

Federal regulators plan to divert more water from the Apalachicola - Chattahoochee - Flint River System to the state of Georgia.

Boats rest on a dock in the Apalachicola Bay
Jason Tereska / WFSU News

Georgia is wrapping up its case this week in a nearly 30-year-old water fight with Florida and Alabama. The so-called water wars centers on consumption in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system shared by the states.

boat on Apalachicola Bay
Jessica Palombo / WFSU News

A trial over a 26-year water fight between Florida and Georgia is underway before the U.S. Supreme Court.  A special master appointed by the court began hearing arguments Monday. 

Tom Flanigan

Things are getting worse for the people who've fished the Gulf waters for generations. A Wakulla County benefit over the weekend aimed to raise money and awareness for those who make their living from the sea.

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