Affordable Care Act

Dunn campaign

Last year, north Florida voters sent two polar opposites, Republican Neal Dunn and Democrat Al Lawson, to represent them in Congress. The wide philosophical and partisan gulf separating the two men – and much of the nation -- was on full display during recent appearances in Tallahassee.

Congressman Dunn Visits, Talks Washington Climate

Aug 2, 2017
Rep. Neal Dunn (R-FL2)
Neal Dunn Campaign

Florida Congressman Neal Dunn (R-Panama City) visited Tallahassee Wednesday to speak with a group of Republicans about the political climate in Washington.

U.S. Rep. Neal Dunn, R-Panama City, is not planning to hold a town hall in his district this week. But the North Florida Republican did recently sit down for a television interview with CSPAN.

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum said he’ll pass legislation to strengthen health insurance provisions if he’s elected governor. Gillum says his proposed legislation was prompted by the U.S. House vote repealing the Affordable Care Act last week.

Bill Nelson youtube / Bill Nelson's youtube channel

The Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is now in the U.S. Senate. The legislation cuts state funding for the medical care of low-income people. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, said he doesn’t support the proposal.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) says it's time for Florida to have an independent redistricting commission.
Nick Evans

Poor Floridians may see less access to medical care. Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, said the state is turning down billions of dollars in federal funding for health care this year because it is not expanding Medicaid. Florida lawmakers are also planning to cut Medicaid and hospital funding.

Governor Rick Scott.
The Florida Channel

Florida Governor Rick Scott says Republicans should start chipping away at eliminating the Affordable Care Act. He spoke to Fox News after attending a White House bill signing.

iStockphoto

An effort to expand direct primary care sailed through its first committee meeting Tuesday in the Florida statehouse. The healthcare model allows patients to pay doctors monthly fees in exchange for basic services. Proponents say the system cuts out insurers, and lowers costs and wait times. David McKalip represents the Florida Chapter of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.

Tom Flanigan

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act appears almost certain. On Monday (1/23) a Tallahassee doctor who also teaches at the Florida State University College of Medicine was speaking on what might happen next.

healthcare.gov

Florida is leading the country in signing up for federal health insurance coverage for 2017 according to federal figures. With still about a month left in the open enrollment period, the numbers are expected to grow even as the Republican-controlled Congress plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act as early as this week.

healthcare.gov

Open enrollment for Obamacare ups begins next month, and state and federal officials are hoping for more young, healthy enrollees. That demographic has been slow to sign up, leading to increasing concerns that the Affordable Care Act, may soon become un-affordable. But health policy experts say tales of the death of the ACA are greatly exaggerated.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is blasting double-digit increases in Obamacare premiums just as the administration gears up for the Nov. 1st start of open enrollment.

taxcredits.net

The federal government is playing down the 25 percent average rate hike slated to go into effect under the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell
Juan Manuel Herrera / OAS/flickr.com

Federal health officials are making their final push to get more people signed up for subsidized health insurance.  So far more than 8.6 million new and returning consumers have applied for health insurance on federal exchanges.

Florida Office of Insurance Regulation / State of Florida

Florida’s health insurance market for next year is beginning to take shape, and there will be cost increases. But  that’s not what’s raising eyebrows. In Florida, managed care health plans will dominate the market place, and the emergence of a new system  has some wondering, what is an EPO?

LHatter / WFSU News

Update 7/24/15:   More information on Florida rates under the Affordable Care Act. The Florida Office of Insurance Regulation hasn't released information on more than 12 other health insurers. According to its website, "displayed rate changes may not fully reflect increases and decreases due to claims of trade secret." There are several companies that have posted requests but they are blocked. OIR handles all proposals, but those over 10 percent are posted to CMS. The state has blocked the requests from insurers who have requested rate increases under 10 percent of which several are pending.

Cost Concerns Drive Healthcare Conversation

Jul 16, 2015
taxcredits.net

With the Supreme Court reaffirming the Affordable Care Act, questions about its future linger. One big issue  not addressed is the rising cost.

Janet Applefield of Clearwater, Fl. Applefield has had trouble getting her prescriptions processed due to step therapy regulations.
Janet Applefield

As more people gain insurance under the Affordable Care Act, they’ve been running into problems with medications and finding doctors. Now an old practice--one put in place to address the rising cost of medications, is becoming increasingly burdensome for doctors, patients and pharmacists.

LHatter / WFSU News

The fight over the future of Healthcare in Florida is not over, despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling reaffirming the Affordable Care Act. The Court has upheld subsidies for nearly nine million Americans who purchased health insurance on the federal government’s insurance exchange. Some hope the court’s latest ruling could push states like Florida, to fully implement the law.

Infographic via Kaiser Health News/Kaiser Family Foundation shows what type of insurance exchange is used by each state.
Kaiser Family Foundation

The healthcare advocacy group Families USA recently reported more than a million Floridians could’ve either lost their insurance or seen prices rise dramatically had the U.S. Supreme Court rule against the subsidies.

Infographic via Kaiser Health News/Kaiser Family Foundation shows what type of insurance exchange is used by each state.
Kaiser Family Foundation

The U.S. Supreme Court will soon decide whether health insurance subsidies for millions of Americans in 34 states, are legal. And if the high court says they aren’t, 1.3 million Floridians could lose their health insurance, or end up paying far more for it.