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Every weekday, WFSU-FM presents the nation's best reporting, commentary and analysis on NPR's newsmagazine, All Things Considered. Multi-award winning All Things Considered offers an in-depth presentation of the day's news.

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Joining us from his office at the Capitol now is California Republican Congressman David Dreier. Welcome to the program.

REPRESENTATIVE DAVID DREIER: Always good to be with you, Robert. And as the sun sets across the country, happy Hanukkah.

Prominent Iowa Conservative Backs Santorum

Dec 20, 2011

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

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Stephen Daldry Discusses New Movie

Dec 20, 2011

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

The airwaves in Iowa are filled with a lot of people saying some not very nice things about Newt Gingrich.

Margaret Thatcher's policies as British prime minister earned her the nickname "The Iron Lady," and now that's also the title of a new film about her life.

Thatcher was famously tough on British labor unions, IRA hunger strikers, the Soviet Union and the war with Argentina over the Falkland Islands. So in the film, when visiting U.S. Secretary of State Alexander Haig questions Thatcher's knowledge of war, the then-prime minister's response is predictably unyielding.

AT&T Drops T-Mobile Bid

Dec 19, 2011

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Perhaps Kim Jong Il's most enduring legacy was to turn North Korea into a nuclear weapons state. The country successfully tested a nuclear bomb underground in 2006, and a second test followed in 2009.

With Kim's death, which was announced Monday, his presumed successor is his son Kim Jong Un. But little is known about him or his thinking on the country's nuclear program.

In this age of bland romantic comedy leads, when the feminine ideal seems to mix two parts sweetly smiling Jennifer Aniston with three parts saucer-eyed Rapunzel, nothing can bring more satisfaction than the antiheroine.

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Retiring from military service can pose some unique challenges. One of the big ones is finding a job. For veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the unemployment rate is 11.1 percent. That's two and a half points higher than the overall unemployment rate.

House Poised To Reject Budget Deal

Dec 19, 2011

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'Wired' Editor Discusses 2011's Best Apps

Dec 19, 2011

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It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

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I'm Robert Siegel, and it's time now for All Tech Considered.

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And now to the spreading influence of apps and tablets in the business world. As NPR's Sonari Glinton reports, many small businesses are using tablets to replace everything from the menu to the timecard to the cash register.

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And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Many Koreans who live in the United States are following the situation in North Korea closely. Southern California is home to a huge Korean community.

And as NPR's Carrie Kahn reports, news of Kim Jong Il's death has been greeted there with shock and anxiety.

Historical fiction invites us to experience the exotic and the unknown while confirming our common humanity. I do not believe that human nature has changed much over the centuries, and it is possible to identify with the emotions, passions, and fears of men and women long dead.

2011 was a good year to be a reader of science fiction and fantasy, although lately every year has been a good year: Not only are the books getting more popular — thank you, Game of Thrones — they're getting more interesting, evolving and morphing in weird, fascinating ways.

They're also interbreeding with other genres to produce wild new hybrid forms, like historical science fiction romances and hard-boiled fantasy detective novels. They're commenting on current events and swapping DNA with literary novels.

I found The Twin, by Gerbrand Bakker, sitting on a coffee table at a writers' colony in 2009. It carried praise from J.M. Coetzee for its "restrained tenderness and laconic humor," which seemed ample justification for using it to avoid my own writing.

I finished it, weeping, a day later, and have been puzzling over its powerful hold on me ever since. I've recommended it again and again, and while I can't say it's entirely undiscovered — it won the 2010 IMPAC Dublin Award — no one I know ever seems to have heard of it.

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

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