Vanessa Romo

Updated at 9:32 p.m. ET

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is suing Tesla CEO Elon Musk, alleging securities fraud a month after he announced that he planned to take the publicly traded electric-car company private.

"Musk's false and misleading public statements and omissions caused significant confusion and disruption in the market for Tesla's stock and resulting harm to investors," the lawsuit says.

Dunkin' Donuts, purveyor of, well, donuts and other confections typically ingested in far too much haste, is dropping Donuts from its name starting in January. The company says it's making the move to become better friends with its customers.

"After 68 years of America running on Dunkin', we're moving to a first-name basis. Excited to be #BFFstatus with you all," the company announced in a heavy emoji-laden tweet on Tuesday.

Even as he was making plans to rent a Taipei apartment last week, it appears that Cody Wilson had already severed all ties with the controversial 3D gun printing company he founded in 2012.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Walmart Inc. on Friday, alleging the company has unlawfully discriminated against pregnant workers for years at one of its warehouse locations in Wisconsin.

The complaint, filed in federal court on behalf of Alyssa Gilliam, claims Walmart failed to accommodate workers' pregnancy-related medical restrictions, even though job modifications were provided to non-pregnant employees with physical disabilities. It also says the company denied pregnant workers' requests for unpaid leave.

The founder of the 3D gun printing company embroiled in a legal battle with the U.S. government over making the DIY instructions publicly accessible online has been accused of sexually assaulting a minor in Texas.

Cody Wilson was charged with the second-degree felony on Wednesday, according to the Austin Police Department.

Updated at 9:42 a.m. ET on Friday

Federal authorities have opened an investigation into a series of explosions that set off fires in several small towns in Massachusetts on Thursday night, killing one person and injuring several others.

The National Transportation Safety Board announced Friday that it is sending a team to investigate "what certainly appears to be multiple explosions involving a natural gas pipeline."

A federal judge denied bail on Wednesday to all five members of an extended family accused of operating a training camp for a violent attack on public institutions out of their isolated New Mexico compound.

During the arraignment hearing, Magistrate Judge Kirtan Khalsa told the defendants there was "clear and convincing evidence that you are a danger to the community," The Associated Press reported.

Don't think of it as a reversal.

Think of it as the first act of a movie in which the lead — an incredibly attractive, symmetrically faced character — is up against seemingly insurmountable odds. Except in this version, that handsome-yet-relatable hero is the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The challenge it faces is trying to make the sluggish annual Oscar ceremony a bit more lively. Only, it's meeting a lot of resistance.

Pennsylvania ordered a lockdown Wednesday of its entire state prison system after a number of staffers became ill from suspected exposure to tainted synthetic drugs, an incident that comes as five inmates have died from overdoses in Arkansas and dozens were sickened in Ohio under similar circumstances.

State Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said the cautionary move was aimed at ensuring the "safety and security of our employees" after multiple illnesses among prison staff in recent weeks.

Kushner Cos. has been hit with $210,000 in fines by New York City regulators for filing false real estate paperwork over several years.

President Trump's son-in-law — and current adviser — Jared Kushner was still at the helm of the real estate company as CEO when, the New York City Department of Buildings says, the company routinely falsified construction applications at 17 sites.

Updated at 9:37 a.m. ET

The St. Louis Archdiocese is handing over its records to the state Attorney General's office for an investigation into the Missouri church's handling of sexual abuse accusations against clergy members.

The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a $1.95 million settlement for the family of a homeless man who was fatally shot by police in a botched arrest on Skid Row.

In 2015 three Los Angeles Police Department officers shot Charly Leundeu Keunang five times. He was unarmed and mentally ill.

Firefighters continue to battle the largest fire in California history even as another large blaze has been contained.

The Ranch Fire, one of the two wildfires that make up the Mendocino Complex, has burned through 341,047 acres — or 533 square miles — and is at 76 percent containment, Cal Fires reported on Sunday.

Updated on Aug. 10 at 4:45 p.m. ET

Immigration officials have returned a mother and daughter to the United States after they were deported, which had angered a federal judge who was hearing their lawsuit.

Five days after multiple news outlets reported that Tokyo Medical University officials systematically cheated women out of rightfully earned spots at the prestigious college by lowering their admission-test scores, officials have confirmed the practice and apologized for the discrimination.

CBS' CEO Leslie Moonves will remain at the helm of the media company as the board of directors launches an investigation into allegations that he sexually assaulted several women over decades.

British counterterrorism detectives investigating the poisoning of a couple with Novichok announced Friday that they have found the source of the deadly nerve agent.

Police said that on Wednesday, they discovered a "small bottle" containing Novichok inside the home of Charlie Rowley, who along with his girlfriend, Dawn Sturgess, was exposed to the deadly toxin and admitted to the hospital on June 30.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel hammered out a last-minute deal to end a political standoff with her interior minister, Horst Seehofer, over the country's migration policy that threatened to collapse their coalition government.

Seehofer, who is also the leader of Bavaria's Christian Social Union — which is closely linked to Merkel's Christian Democrats — had threatened to resign because the chancellor would not refuse entry to migrants who have asylum claims pending in other European Union countries.

A Texas sheriff has barred his deputies from taking on additional work as off-duty security at a recently built tent encampment intended to house migrant children separated from their parents at the border.

El Paso Sheriff Richard Wiles said he feared the assignment to oversee minors forcibly separated from their parents would fuel the current controversy over the practice and undermine trust between law enforcement and the people they serve.

At some point, they were in love.

At least it looks as if they were in a photo that captures Emile Cilliers and his wife, Victoria, in what seems to be a moment of joy. He is dressed in a tuxedo and bow tie and has a closed-mouthed smile. She is wearing a deep blue halter with dangling earrings that match. Her smile is broad, and her arm is wrapped around his neck.

But the evidence — texts, emails and botched murder attempts — suggest that moment was ephemeral.

The former president and CEO of USA Gymnastics, Steve Penny, was dismissed from a hearing before a U.S. Senate subcommittee investigating the sexual abuse of athletes by ex-team doctor Larry Nassar on Tuesday after Penny refused to answer questions by lawmakers.

Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

President Trump has disinvited this year's Super Bowl winners, the Philadelphia Eagles, from a victory celebration at the White House Tuesday. The reason: the team won't promise that all players will stand with hand on heart for the national anthem.

In a statement issued Monday, Trump provided the following explanation: "They disagree with their President because he insists that they proudly stand for the National Anthem, hand on heart, in honor of the great men and women of our military and the people of our country."

In 1980s Catherine Healy was a young school teacher who liked to travel and made an unconventional choice to help fund her adventures — one she told the New Zealand Herald drove her mother to tears. She left the classroom for the bedroom, or more accurately an illegal brothel.

In the process, Healy said she went from earning about $400 a week as an educator to a whopping $2000 a week as a sex worker, which made it easier to pay for her trips abroad.

Updated at 7:03 p.m. ET

Howard Schultz announced Monday he will be stepping down as Starbucks' executive chairman and member of the board of directors on June 26.

For two glorious hours it was the gift that kept on giving. And on Christmas Day no less.

Between 5:51 p.m. and 7:53 p.m. last December, South Carolinians playing the state lottery were treated to tens of thousands of winning Holiday Cash Add-A-Play tickets, each worth up to $500 regardless of the holder's good or bad behavior.

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