Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

A day after Sen. John McCain urged his Senate colleagues to reject Gina Haspel as CIA director because she had overseen torture of detainees, a White House official reportedly mocked the ailing Arizona Republican, saying his opinion "doesn't matter" because "he's dying anyway."

The video shows a white police officer choking a young tuxedo-clad man who is African-American, pushing him against a storefront and then slamming him to the ground outside a North Carolina Waffle House.

The 27-second clip provides no context for the confrontation, but the image of the burly officer, dressed in tactical gear, subduing the skinny young man, who is pleading to be let go, is the latest such video to go viral, sparking outrage and accusations of police brutality.

The bodies of seven people, including four children, have been discovered following an apparent mass homicide in a small town in Western Australia.

The remains were found in the town of Osmington, some 150 miles south of Perth in the Margaret River wine-growing region of Western Australia.

West Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson would not say how the victims died, but indicated that two firearms were found on the property and that "It appears that gunshot wounds are there."

Updated at 3:30 a.m. ET

Three American men who had been held by North Korea touched U.S. soil once again early Thursday, where they were met by President Trump, who has hailed his diplomacy with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for winning their freedom.

The trio — Kim Dong Chul, Kim Hak Song and Tony Kim – all held on charges of espionage, arrived at Joint Base Andrews just outside of Washington, D.C., at about 2:40 a.m. ET. Their plane taxied to the meeting area, where a giant U.S. flag was suspended over the tarmac.

Geologists are warning that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano — which has been belching toxic gas and oozing lava into a residential area for the past week — could erupt explosively in the coming weeks.

The possibility of such a sudden eruption will increase as lava flows from Kilauea's summit crater down its face and magma falls below the water table, the U.S. Geological Survey said. That could create steam pressure that would then explode.

The volcano could then eject "ballistic rocks" of lava up to several feet in diameter, the USGS said.

The government of Congo declared a new outbreak of Ebola after at least two people were infected and possibly as many as 17 died from the disease in the country's northwest.

"Our country is facing another epidemic of the Ebola virus, which constitutes an international public health emergency," the Democratic Republic of the Congo's health ministry said in a statement.

An ex-CIA officer arrested in January at New York's John F. Kennedy airport has been charged with conspiracy to commit espionage on behalf of China years after FBI agents turned up notebooks containing classified information in a search of his hotel room.

Sun Zhengcai, a former Chinese Politburo member who seemed destined for a top leadership position, has been sentenced to life in prison — the latest senior figure to fall in President Xi Jinping's war on corruption.

Sun, 54, was sentenced on bribery charges by the No. 1 Intermediate People's Court in the northern port city of Tianjin after pleading guilty on April 12. He admitted to taking $27 million in bribes.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET

Russian President Vladimir Putin took the oath of office for a fourth term as president – solidifying his place as the country's longest-serving leader since Communist dictator Josef Stalin. Putin easily won re-election in March after his chief opponent was disqualified.

The elaborate Kremlin ceremony took place at the Grand Kremlin Palace at noon Moscow time.

Rudy Giuliani, the latest addition to President Trump's legal team, spent much of the weekend trying to clarify statements he made earlier concerning his client's legal troubles.

The most extensive air-sea search in history failed to find Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which vanished without a trace in 2014, but it may have solved the mysterious fate of two 19th century sailing ships.

A jagged crack suddenly appeared in a window aboard a Southwest Airlines 737 on Wednesday, startling passengers and forcing the pilot on the Chicago-to-Newark flight to divert to Cleveland, where he made a safe landing.

People are being warned not to feed the animals: kangaroos, specifically, at a psychiatric hospital in Australia's New South Wales that has become a hot spot for tourists seeking the perfect #rooselfie with the marsupials.

For some who ignore the advice, the consequences range from kicks and scratches to serious injury in a few cases — two men were attacked recently, one who received a deep gash to the stomach and another who required 17 stitches to his face, according to Greg Piper, a member of the New South Wales Parliament.

The two black men arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks last month have reached a settlement with the coffee chain and the city.

Updated at 10:10 a.m. ET

Iowa's Legislature has passed a bill that would make most abortions illegal once a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

The measure, which would effectively ban abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy, passed the state House late Tuesday and the state Senate early Wednesday. Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds has not said whether she will sign the bill.

In December 2015, Donald Trump's personal physician released a letter describing his patient's health in language that sounded more like it was written by the patient himself than the doctor — and it turns out that might be exactly what happened.

"If elected, Mr. Trump, I can state unequivocally, will be the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency," Dr. Harold Bornstein, a gastroenterologist from Lenox Hospital in New York, wrote at the time.

Film star Ashley Judd has become the latest to file a lawsuit against Harvey Weinstein, accusing the embattled former Hollywood producer of damaging her career after she rebuffed his sexual advances.

In a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles, Judd alleges sexual harassment and defamation, saying Weinstein "badmouthed her to filmmaker Peter Jackson and cost her a role in the Lord of the Rings trilogy," according to Hollywood Reporter.

An abandoned 26-story building in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil, caught fire and collapsed early Tuesday, showering the surrounding streets with fiery embers and killing at least one person, firefighters said.

About 150 firefighters were battling the blaze, which started at about 1:30 a.m. local time. It is thought to have been caused by a gas explosion, according to reports.

About 50 families had lived as squatters in the building since it was abandoned as the headquarters of the federal police, reports said.

Anyone who has ever owned a dog – or any pet, for that matter – can tell you how difficult that last day is.

And so it must have been for the owners of 114 Sony Aibo robotic dogs whose beloved pets were given a Buddhist send-off last week at a ceremony at Japan's 450-year-old Kofukuji Temple.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

A few of the nearly 200 migrants from Central America who traveled by caravan through Mexico to the U.S. border crossing at San Diego have been allowed to apply for asylum.

Eight migrants — three women, four children and an 18-year-old — who said they were fleeing violence in their home countries were allowed through the gate at the border separating Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego on Monday evening, according to caravan organizers.

A magistrate in Australia has ordered Cardinal George Pell, one of the Vatican's senior-most officials, to stand trial on sexual abuse charges involving allegations from multiple individuals dating back decades.

Pell is the highest-ranking Vatican official to be charged in the church's long-standing sex abuse scandal.

Britain's Home Secretary Amber Rudd has resigned after acknowledging that she misled lawmakers about targets for deporting immigrants.

Rudd stepped down following the publication of a letter she sent to Prime Minister Theresa May discussing the "ambitious but deliverable" goal to deport 10 percent more illegal immigrants in the coming years.

Updated 3:55 p.m. ET

A woman who worked as an NBC correspondent says longtime network anchor Tom Brokaw made unwanted advances, including groping her and trying forcibly to kiss her, some two decades ago. Brokaw denied the claims in a email to his colleagues on Friday.

Linda Vester, who covered the Middle East and Africa for NBC and later joined Fox News, was in her 20s at the time she alleges Brokaw made the advances, Variety magazine reports.

President Trump's longtime attorney, Michael Cohen, will invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in a civil lawsuit brought by adult entertainer Stormy Daniels — a move that would prevent him revealing anything that could be used later by federal prosecutors.

"Based on the advice of counsel, I will assert my 5th Amendment rights in connection with all proceedings in this case due to the ongoing criminal investigation by the FBI and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York," Cohen wrote in the filing in Los Angeles federal court.

The U.S. and South Korea are likely to hold a summit next month ahead of a separate proposed summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that could come as early as next month.

That is according to remarks from an unnamed South Korean presidential official quoted by Reuters.

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