Sascha Cordner

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Environmentalists are urging Governor Rick Scott to sign a measure that would designate April 7th as Everglades Day in Florida. As Sascha Cordner reports, the Governor has until Saturday to sign the bill into law.

Dawn Shirreffs is the Everglades Restoration Manager for the National Park Conservation Association. She says environmental groups do not want a repeat of last year when the Everglades and other conservation projects did not get the necessary funds:

With Summer just around the corner, some Florida parents have already started looking for camps to sign their kids up for. As Sascha Cordner reports, the Department of Children and Families has some tips for parents on how to choose a safe camp for their children.

Florida is one of a few states in the nation that requires high-level background screenings for summer camp employees. Department of Children and Families Spokeswoman Erin Gillespie says there are basic questions that parents can ask to make sure camp personnel are appropriately screened and trained.

A Republican state lawmaker is in the clear, after the Florida Ethics Commission dismissed a complaint against him. As Sascha Cordner reports, the panel decided the case during a closed-door meeting Friday.

State Senator Mike Fasano says he’s happy the ethics panel dismissed the complaint. The New Port Richey lawmaker says the commission members understood Fasano was not trying to “intimidate” anyone by comments he made last year. It was while Fasano was serving spaghetti at an event to raise money for his county.

Sascha Cordner

Governor Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi ran about two-miles with law enforcement officers Tuesday to raise awareness and money for the Special Olympics. As Sascha Cordner reports, they were also joined by two special Olympic athletes, who ran the whole way with them for the cause.

Nineteen-year-old Keith Cline is shaking Governor Rick Scott’s hand, as they’re both gearing up for a 1.7 mile run.

Keith is a veteran Special Olympics Torch Run Athlete, having run 1.4 miles last year with the Governor in a Law Enforcement Torch Run.

Tallahassee natural gas customers should see lower charges on their next utility bills. As Sascha Cordner reports, at the start of April, natural gas rates for residential customers decreased by three-percent.

General Manager for Tallahassee’s Underground Utilities Mike Tadros says thanks to more residents turning to natural gas as a fuel source, the city is seeing much lower rates.

The lawyer for Rachel Hoffman’s parents says the family can move on with their lives, now that Governor Rick Scott signed a claims bill compensating them for the loss of their child. As Sascha Cordner reports, they’ve spent the last four years fighting for their daughter, who was killed in an undercover drug sting gone wrong.

Lance Block is the attorney for Rachel Hoffman’s parents, Irving Hoffman and Marjorie Weiss. He says they’re grateful the Governor and the Legislature allowed them to have the $2.4 million dollars for the loss of their daughter.

A union that represents the state's probation officers is leaving it up to a judge to decide whether it's legal for probation officers to have to cut back on the number of visits they make each month to the homes of parolees. As Sascha Cordner reports, the Teamsters Union claims the move is a danger to the public and could lead to the loss of jobs.

Faced with a $79 million budget deficit, the Florida Department of Corrections is trying to find ways to cut costs.

The head of Florida’s child protection agency is getting a new job in addition to his current one. As Sascha Cordner reports, Governor Rick Scott has appointed David Wilkins as the state’s first Chief Operating Officer for Government Operations.

Scott’s Spokesman Lane Wright says Department of Children and Families Secretary David Wilkins is now in charge of finding ways to trim costs in state Government. Wright says the new role comes because of his good track record at his own agency.

The union representing correctional and probation officers claims the Department of Correction’s decision to reduce the number of visits probation officers make to released convicts’ homes is not only a public safety risk, but is also illegal. As Sascha Cordner reports, the budgetary move by the agency is now facing a legal challenge by the Teamsters Union.

A bill that would prohibit the use of restraints on pregnant prison inmates during and after childbirth is making its way to Governor Rick Scott. As Sascha Cordner reports, one labor group is urging the Governor to “end cruelty against pregnant prisoners” by signing the bill into law.

American Civil Liberties Union of Florida Spokesman Baylor Johnson says the practice of “shackling” women during and after childbirth in Florida jails and prisons is unacceptable:

A deadly Tallahassee crash that occurred more than a week ago on Tennessee and Monroe left two people seriously injured and three people dead, including two elementary school boys. As Sascha Cordner reports, their principal is weighing in on the tragedy.

Spring Break is now officially over for the children at Ruediger Elementary, and as students walk the halls of the school, there will be two kids permanently missing from its 4th grade roster:

Nine-year-old Vincent Vickers and 10-year-old Tyler Biggins. Melissa Fullmore is the Principal of Ruediger Elementary.

A state budget item that would allow newborns to get screened for a certain disease is now in Governor Rick Scott’s hands. As Sascha Cordner reports, if Scott does not veto the Health Care Budget item, proponents say it would give babies born without a normal immune system a chance at a normal life.

Twenty-two-month-old Kye Johnson is playing with his mother, Alethea Arthur. He’s your typical infant, getting into things, and playing with toys and a bag of crayons.

“Whoa! Are you okay? [baby laughter] [Hearing a rooster crowing] [Mother Alethea  laughing]”

A weekend wreck that left three people dead and two people seriously injured is still under investigation by the Tallahassee Police Department. As Sascha Cordner reports, no charges have yet been filed in Saturday’s traffic crash at the intersection of Monroe and Tennessee Street.

It’s possible the investigation into the fatal traffic crash could take weeks and even months to complete before any charges are filed. Assistant State Attorney for the State Attorney’s Office David Marsey says a hasty arrest could have a negative impact on the prosecution of the case.

This year, the Florida Legislature passed several claims bills to compensate individuals for injuries or losses suffered due to the negligence of the government. 10 of the bills are on the Governor’s desk, and another has already been signed. As Sascha Cordner reports, with about $40-million dollars in claims to sort through, the Governor says it’s not going to be an easy task.

Tallahassee police have arrested a man who intended to burglarize several cars in a city neighborhood. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, authorities say it’s because of two local heroes that a criminal is now off the streets.

Tallahassee Police Spokesman Dave Northway says Michael Nesbit and Carin Butler were sitting on a porch at 1325 Jackson Street, when they spotted 56-year-old David Sampson entering several driveways and pulling on car door handles.

Drug testing state employees just became an option for state agencies, after Governor Rick Scott signed the bill into law late Monday. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, opponents say the state should be prepared to be taken to court.

Maria Kayanan is with the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, the group currently challenging a 2011 executive order by the Governor to randomly drug test state employees.

Employees of state agencies do not lose their constitutional rights, simply because they are employed by the Government.”

A weekend traffic crash has left three people dead. As Sascha Cordner reports, the wreck happened at the intersection of West Tennessee Street and North Monroe Street.

Tallahassee Police are investigating a four-vehicle crash that happened late Saturday night and has so far resulted in the death of three people and left two people seriously injured.

The deadly crash was for the most part between two cars, which both happen to be Jeep Cherokees.

How did State workers fare this session? From the voting down of the prison privatization bill to the passage of a drug-testing bill, the general consensus seems to be better than last session, but not by much. Sascha Cordner has more.

“All state workers, in my opinion, fear whenever the Legislature comes in town.”

A slew of bills are heading to Governor Rick Scott’s desk. As Sascha Cordner reports, that includes a bill that would compensate the parents of a girl who died in botched undercover drug sting in Tallahassee.

Democratic Representative John Patrick Julien says he thinks the Rachel Hoffman claims bill has a good chance of getting signed by the Governor:

A national non-profit group in favor of open government practices has given Leon County an “A” for transparency. As Sascha Cordner reports, county officials say it’s due to the redesign of their web site about three months ago.

After considering about six-thousand government websites across the nation, the Sunshine Review chose just a little more than 200 to receive the Sunny Award for open and transparent government. Leon County was one of the 214 recognized. County Administrator Vince Long says it’s understandable why the county received such an honor.

Sascha Cordner

It’s been called the “pill mill capital of the nation,” but Florida’s reputation could soon go away thanks to the state’s effort to crack down on the illegal sale of prescription drugs.  As Sascha Cordner reports, several state officials say while they’ve been successful so far, there’s more to be done.

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor is remaining tight-lipped on a federal investigation looking into allegations that she bribed a Republican Congressional candidate to drop out of the race. Sascha Cordner has more.

On Monday, Carroll denied she offered any job to Congressional Candidate James Jett, so that he would drop out of the race to make way for U.S. Representative Cliff Stearns. A day later, her answer was relatively the same:

“I’ve already submitted…made my statement,” said Carroll.

Sascha Cordner

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor and the state’s new elections chief want the public’s help in selecting their favorite buildings in Florida. As Sascha Cordner reports, there’s a new launching an online voting competition to celebrate the state’s architectural structures.

It’s called the “Florida Architecture: 100 years. 100 Places. Competition.” It’s an online contest that highlights the best of Florida’s architecture, and with the help of residents, recognizes the best-looking buildings in the state.

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor is remaining tight-lipped on a federal investigation looking into allegations that she bribed a Republican Congressional candidate to drop out of the race.

On Monday, Carroll denied she offered any job to Congressional Candidate James Jett to drop out of the race to make way for U.S. Representative Cliff Stearns. A day later, her answer was relatively the same:

“I’ve already submitted…made my statement.”

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor and the state’s new elections chief want the public’s help in selecting their favorite buildings in Florida. As Sascha Cordner reports, there’s a new launching an online voting competition to celebrate the state’s architectural structures.

It’s called the “Florida Architecture: 100 years. 100 Places. Competition.” It’s an online contest that highlights the best of Florida’s architecture, and with the help of residents, recognizes the best-looking buildings in the state.

Pages