Sascha Cordner

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

A weekend wreck that left three people dead and two people seriously injured is still under investigation by the Tallahassee Police Department. As Sascha Cordner reports, no charges have yet been filed in Saturday’s traffic crash at the intersection of Monroe and Tennessee Street.

It’s possible the investigation into the fatal traffic crash could take weeks and even months to complete before any charges are filed. Assistant State Attorney for the State Attorney’s Office David Marsey says a hasty arrest could have a negative impact on the prosecution of the case.

This year, the Florida Legislature passed several claims bills to compensate individuals for injuries or losses suffered due to the negligence of the government. 10 of the bills are on the Governor’s desk, and another has already been signed. As Sascha Cordner reports, with about $40-million dollars in claims to sort through, the Governor says it’s not going to be an easy task.

Tallahassee police have arrested a man who intended to burglarize several cars in a city neighborhood. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, authorities say it’s because of two local heroes that a criminal is now off the streets.

Tallahassee Police Spokesman Dave Northway says Michael Nesbit and Carin Butler were sitting on a porch at 1325 Jackson Street, when they spotted 56-year-old David Sampson entering several driveways and pulling on car door handles.

Drug testing state employees just became an option for state agencies, after Governor Rick Scott signed the bill into law late Monday. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, opponents say the state should be prepared to be taken to court.

Maria Kayanan is with the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, the group currently challenging a 2011 executive order by the Governor to randomly drug test state employees.

Employees of state agencies do not lose their constitutional rights, simply because they are employed by the Government.”

A weekend traffic crash has left three people dead. As Sascha Cordner reports, the wreck happened at the intersection of West Tennessee Street and North Monroe Street.

Tallahassee Police are investigating a four-vehicle crash that happened late Saturday night and has so far resulted in the death of three people and left two people seriously injured.

The deadly crash was for the most part between two cars, which both happen to be Jeep Cherokees.

How did State workers fare this session? From the voting down of the prison privatization bill to the passage of a drug-testing bill, the general consensus seems to be better than last session, but not by much. Sascha Cordner has more.

“All state workers, in my opinion, fear whenever the Legislature comes in town.”

A slew of bills are heading to Governor Rick Scott’s desk. As Sascha Cordner reports, that includes a bill that would compensate the parents of a girl who died in botched undercover drug sting in Tallahassee.

Democratic Representative John Patrick Julien says he thinks the Rachel Hoffman claims bill has a good chance of getting signed by the Governor:

A national non-profit group in favor of open government practices has given Leon County an “A” for transparency. As Sascha Cordner reports, county officials say it’s due to the redesign of their web site about three months ago.

After considering about six-thousand government websites across the nation, the Sunshine Review chose just a little more than 200 to receive the Sunny Award for open and transparent government. Leon County was one of the 214 recognized. County Administrator Vince Long says it’s understandable why the county received such an honor.

Sascha Cordner

It’s been called the “pill mill capital of the nation,” but Florida’s reputation could soon go away thanks to the state’s effort to crack down on the illegal sale of prescription drugs.  As Sascha Cordner reports, several state officials say while they’ve been successful so far, there’s more to be done.

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor is remaining tight-lipped on a federal investigation looking into allegations that she bribed a Republican Congressional candidate to drop out of the race. Sascha Cordner has more.

On Monday, Carroll denied she offered any job to Congressional Candidate James Jett, so that he would drop out of the race to make way for U.S. Representative Cliff Stearns. A day later, her answer was relatively the same:

“I’ve already submitted…made my statement,” said Carroll.

Sascha Cordner

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor and the state’s new elections chief want the public’s help in selecting their favorite buildings in Florida. As Sascha Cordner reports, there’s a new launching an online voting competition to celebrate the state’s architectural structures.

It’s called the “Florida Architecture: 100 years. 100 Places. Competition.” It’s an online contest that highlights the best of Florida’s architecture, and with the help of residents, recognizes the best-looking buildings in the state.

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor is remaining tight-lipped on a federal investigation looking into allegations that she bribed a Republican Congressional candidate to drop out of the race.

On Monday, Carroll denied she offered any job to Congressional Candidate James Jett to drop out of the race to make way for U.S. Representative Cliff Stearns. A day later, her answer was relatively the same:

“I’ve already submitted…made my statement.”

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor and the state’s new elections chief want the public’s help in selecting their favorite buildings in Florida. As Sascha Cordner reports, there’s a new launching an online voting competition to celebrate the state’s architectural structures.

It’s called the “Florida Architecture: 100 years. 100 Places. Competition.” It’s an online contest that highlights the best of Florida’s architecture, and with the help of residents, recognizes the best-looking buildings in the state.

Florida’s Lieutenant Governor is denying any involvement in offering a Republican Congressional candidate a job to get him to drop out of a race against U.S. Representative Cliff Stearns. Now, as Sascha Cordner reports, that same Congressional candidate is supporting her story.

After a news conference Monday, Carroll says she did not give any job offer on behalf of Stearns’ Campaign. And, James Jett, who says he was offered bribes to drop his campaign, supports her claim.

Tallahassee is expanding its effort to cut down on red light runners. As Sascha Cordner reports, the city is adding red light cameras to an intersection which has had more than 100 crashes in a two-year span.

The intersection of Capital Circle Northeast and Mahan Drive is ranked among the top five in terms of Tallahassee crashes in 2010 and 2011. So, Tallahassee’s Traffic Mobility Manager Allen Secreast says the city has installed two red light cameras, which will come online Wednesday:

A former Florida Congressman is facing a fine of about 260-dollars, after crashing into an Orlando bus over the weekend. As Sascha Cordner reports, the wreck left three people injured.

On his way to a campaign fundraising lunch, authorities say former U-S Representative Alan Grayson ran a red light in his Mercedes Benz, and crashed into a Lynx bus at around noon on Saturday.

Grayson and his passenger were unhurt in the incident, but three people on the bus were taken to a hospital for treatment of minor injuries. The bus and Grayson’s car suffered significant damage. 

It’s now up to the Governor to decide if state employees should be required to “pee in a cup.” As Sascha Cordner reports, a bill allowing state agencies to randomly drug-test their employees passed in the Florida Senate on the last day of session, but not without heated debate.

When Governor Rick Scott issued an executive order last year mandating the drug testing of all state workers, the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida immediately filed a lawsuit and the order is still tied up in litigation.

A bill that would punish coaches for “unethical recruiting” of student athletes has narrowly passed out of the Senate and is making its way to Governor Rick Scott. As Sascha Cordner reports, critics say the bill will unfairly impact the way the Florida High School Athletic Association currently governs that type of situation.

Republican Senator Stephen Wise says he just wants to make sure that high school athletes who transfer schools do not get penalized unfairly, just because they’re suspected of transferring schools due to the recruitment of a coach.

Opponents of a bill that would ban courts from making a decision on certain cases based on foreign law are trying a last ditch effort to get it voted down on the Senate Floor. As Sascha Cordner reports, while the bill’s sponsors say they’re trying to make Florida courts pure, others are calling it an attack on certain religions.

“It’s unacceptable for his Senate to be infested with this hate speech being distributed.”

A recent procedural move by the Senate has both sides of an anti-abortion bill wondering if the debate on the issue is truly over. As Sascha Cordner reports, while some say the bill is dead, others say it’s not over until the last day of session.

Senate President Mike Haridopolos says it's unlikely that legislation aimed at making it harder for women to get abortions is going anywhere this year.

Legislative budget leaders have come to an agreement regarding some of the prison slated to close that could save the state millions of dollars. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, while budget negotiators agreed to keep Jefferson Correctional Institution open, another correctional facility got sacrificed during the budgetary process.

“Most of us have two jobs just to support our jobs, and it’s hard to keep your head up and do the job that you’re supposed to do, when instead you’re getting slapped in the face.”

Sascha Cordner

A group of black lawmakers are urging the Florida Legislature to reverse a provision in Florida’s widely debated elections law. As Sascha Cordner reports, they claim it essentially suppresses African American voters from having their voices heard in future elections.

Supporters of Florida’s elections law say it cuts down on voter fraud. Some of its most contentious provisions include tightening the rules for third party voter registration organizations, like the League of Women Voters, and decreasing the number of days for early voting.

Sascha Cordner

The American Red Cross celebrated the kickoff of Red Cross Month at the Capitol Thursday with the support of Governor Rick Scott. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, the celebration later met an unexpected interruption from people participating in the “Rick-Makes-Me-Sick-Campaign.”

On a windy day at the Capitol, Dan Samborn declared the start of Red Cross Month:

“Red Cross Month started in 1943 with President Roosevelt first proclaiming March as Red Cross Month, and every sitting President since has honored March as Red Cross Month.”

Sascha Cordner

Governor Rick Scott joined other officials at the Capitol Wednesday in the induction of the first members into the Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame. Sascha Cordner has more.

The Florida Civil Rights Hall of Fame sprang out of a 2010 bill, co-authored by the now Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll, Democratic Representative Alan Williams, and former Senator Tony Hill.

In commemorating the last day of Black History Month, they joined other community leaders as well as Governor Rick Scott in the induction of the hall of fame’s first members:

The Florida House passed close to 70 bills Wednesday, ranging from a bill that allows the eviction of tenants on holidays to one that would essentially eliminate a wage-theft protection program in Miami-Dade. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, while some legislation passed with little debate, other measures did not have both parties seeing eye-to-eye.

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