Sascha Cordner

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

Sascha Cordner / WFSU-FM

In the last of a two-part series, WFSU's Sascha Cordner continues the conversation with Florida Department of Corrections Secretary Julie Jones, who has been in her role for more than a year. We’ll hear more about what direction she’d like the prison agency to take, what’s in store for some of her employees, and her take on certain legal challenges affecting the agency.

Last week, we aired Part 1 of our conversation. Listen below to Part 2, which aired on Friday's Capital Report.

MGN Online

Puerto Rico—a U-S territory—has reported its first Zika-related death, and a Florida Senator says it won’t be the last if Congress does not start taking the mosquito-borne disease seriously.

Florida Democratic Senator Bill Nelson says after meeting President Barack Obama’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, he’s backing him.

City of Tallahassee

Amtrak inspected Tallahassee’s train station Wednesday. The inspection is part of an effort to get Congress to fully fund getting the passenger rail service to come back to Tallahassee.

Mary Truglio / FWC's Flickr

Florida wildlife officials are looking to create more sanctuaries across the state to protect vulnerable wildlife from everyday human disturbances during the most critical time in their lives.

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