Regan McCarthy

Senior Producer/Assignment Editor

Regan McCarthy is the Assignment Editor and Senior News Producer for WFSU News/ Florida Public Radio. Before coming to Tallahassee, Regan graduated with honors from Indiana University’s Ernie Pyle School of Journalism. She worked for several years for NPR member station WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., where she covered local and state government and produced feature and community stories. She has also worked for the London Business Matters Magazine and the Rochester Sentinel, a daily local newspaper. She is the recipient of six professional broadcast awards including first-place Best Radio Feature from the Indiana chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.  When she isn’t tracking leading newsmakers she spends her time knitting, reading, strolling through the woods and brunching at new restaurants.  Follow Regan McCarthy on Twitter: @Regan_McCarthy

A view of Doak Stadium from above
Erich Martin

Tallahassee Interim City Manager Reese Goad says he’d like to ensure city employees get more training on when they must decline or report gifts. The move follows an investigation into city employees accepting football tickets.

Kate Payne

The city of Tallahassee is offering to foot the bill for about 130 residents in Tallahassee’s Southside to switch from septic tanks to sewer.

City of Tallahassee

The Tallahassee city commission is joining a group of South Florida cities in a fight against a state gun preemption rule.

Leon County Courthouse,
Michael Rivera via Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of people signed up Tuesday night to be heard on a Leon County firearm ordinance. The county approved a new rule that requires background checks and a waiting period for private guns sales.

WFSUNews

Former Leon County Elections Supervisor Ion Sancho says he’s worried about what could happen if Florida Governor Rick Scott is elected to the U.S. Senate. Sancho says Scott has used his position as governor to disenfranchise voters.

After 14 years, the infrared cameras mounted on Leon County sheriff helicopters are in need of replacement. Lieutenant Lee Majors is the LCSO aviation section commander. He says just like officers patrol in their cars, law enforcement takes to the sky on a regular basis to keep area residents safe. And he says the cameras help them do that at night.

A home hit by a large tree during hurricane hermine
Regan McCarthy WFSU News

Leon County is a pilot community for a new Hurricane Strong Program that’s a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes. County spokesman Mathieu Cavell says the program is focused on community resilience.

Leon County Schools

As Leon County Commissioners consider creating a new tax aimed at supporting local youth, the question of how that money would be spent is growing. A lot of organizations have ideas. Leaders in the Leon County school system say they’d like to see that money help ensure kids are ready to start school.

Leon County Schoolboard member Rosanne Wood says the program has proven successful in other communities.

“They’ve had great success in the six counties that have done it. They’ve brought down infant mortality. They have increased their pre-k enrollment,” Wood says.

Colin Carmichael / Flickr

Leon County Commissioners are considering a new tax. Commissioners agreed during their Tuesday to look into a plan to would create a special taxing authority called the Children’s Services Council. The council could levy up to .5 mills annually. Commissioner John Dailey says creating the board is an obvious choice. He says there are countless issues that need more funding in order to be addressed.

Leon County Courthouse,
Michael Rivera via Wikimedia Commons

Leon County Commissioners have agreed to hear a proposed ordinance to close the so-called gun loophole.

Local governments have little say over the rules that govern firearms. The state passed legislation preempting any local ordinances on the issue. But County attorney Herbert Theile says there is one exception.

Update: Sen. Montford Will Stay In The Senate

Mar 26, 2018
bill montford headshot
Florida Senate

Update 4:30 p.m.

Sen. Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) will keep his seat in the Florida senate. The lawmaker had been mulling a move to run for Tallahassee mayor, but Montford says he realized he could have the greatest impact by continuing in this current position.

Erich Martin

Do you wish you could get a better look behind the fence surrounding the new development project on the edge of Cascades Park? 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions standing behind lecturn.
Regan McCarthy / WFSUnews

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions stopped in Tallahassee Thursday to reiterate President Donald Trump’s commitment to addressing the opioid crisis. He says Trump included some “bold” goals when he unveiled a new three-pillar plan earlier this week.

View of the waterworks property from above
Erich Martin

Tallahassee commissioners have approved the sale of the city’s old waterworks buildings. The lot will go to North American Properties--the only developer that submitted a bid. Some public commenters pushed against the sale—raising concerns about how NAP has handled other developments, such as the new housing project currently underway near Cascades Park. But Commissioner Curtis Richardson said the city is lucky to work with NAP.

light trails traveling down South Monroe
Erich Martin

Some call it SOMO, others--part of the South City Culture Club. Whichever name you choose to use, the block between South Monroe and Adams Street is the new site for some of local Tallahassee’s newest developments.

a gas station in Quincy, Florida
Erich Martin

As lawmakers shifted their spending priorities this legislative session to school safety initiatives following the Parkland High School shooting, that left less money available for local water projects. And in many cases the projects that did receive funding are generally located in South and Central Florida—leaving small, rural, North Florida communities high and dry.

Josh O'Connor WSFWF

A wild fire burning about 4-miles southwest of Tallahassee is about 60-percent contained. Regan McCarthy reports Florida Forest Service officials are warning motorists to use caution when driving in smoky areas.

Tallahassee leaders are taking stock of what passed and what didn’t this legislative session. Reese Goad is the city’s interim manager

Capitol building at night
Erich Martin

Florida lawmakers officially wrapped up the state’s legislative session late Sunday afternoon. The session came to an end two days later than scheduled due to a hold up on budget negotiations between the House and Senate—much of which hinged on a disagreement over how to fund state hospitals. But House Speaker Richard Corcoran says the legislature has a lot to be proud of.

MGN Online

Florida Governor Rick Scott says he will sign a bill barring anyone under the age of 17 from receiving a marriage license. Lawmakers filed the measure after hearing the story of a Florida woman who was raped by her church deacon as a young girl, became pregnant and was forced to marry him at age 11. Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto (R-Fort Meyers) sponsored the measure in the House.

MGN Online

A measure to address Florida’s growing opioid crisis is nearing completion with just days left in the legislative session.

Laptops at a coffee shop
Leroy

Florida Senators are considering legislation some say could give the state’s residents more ability to create wills and work with notaries. But opponents of the measure argue it could also lead to more fraud.

Rodrigo Senna

An average of fourteen people die every day from opioid related abuse. That’s according to Stuart Republican Representative Gayle Harrell.

She’s glad to see a measure moving through the legislature that aims to curb opioid abuse. The House version ensures doctors and pharmacies use the PDMP or Prescription Drug Monitoring Program database before prescribing or dispensing an opioid. It also allows Florida to share its information across state lines to help cut down on so called doctor shopping. Rep. Jim Boyd (R-Bradenton) says another provision limits the number of pills a doctor can prescribe.

Leon County Website

Leon County Commissioners will take up a move to close a so called loophole that lets people make purchases at gun shows without having to get a background check. Commissioner Mary Ann Lindley discussed the issue at a recent Village Square Town Hall.

Erich Martin

Much has been made this session about efforts by Florida lawmakers to take power away from local governments. But a measure is scheduled for a discussion on the Senate floor Thursday that would expand local control—in this case when it comes to tobacco use.

Right now, decisions about where smoking is allowed are left up to the state. But Senator Debbie Mayfield wants local governments to decide whether people should be allowed to smoke in public parks.

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