Regan McCarthy

Senior Producer/Assignment Editor

Regan McCarthy is the Assignment Editor and Senior News Producer for WFSU News/ Florida Public Radio. Before coming to Tallahassee, Regan graduated with honors from Indiana University’s Ernie Pyle School of Journalism. She worked for several years for NPR member station WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., where she covered local and state government and produced feature and community stories. She has also worked for the London Business Matters Magazine and the Rochester Sentinel, a daily local newspaper. She is the recipient of six professional broadcast awards including first-place Best Radio Feature from the Indiana chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.  When she isn’t tracking leading newsmakers she spends her time knitting, reading, strolling through the woods and brunching at new restaurants.  Follow Regan McCarthy on Twitter: @Regan_McCarthy

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Over the weekend, the number of Zika cases reported by The Department of Health that involve pregnant women in Florida quadrupled. Health experts say that’s not because of an increase in cases, but due to a change in the information the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention is providing.

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Tallahassee Officials are assuring citizens the city’s water is safe to drink. Following the lead outbreak in Flint Michigan, officials say some residents are worried about water quality in Tallahassee. But Jennifer Porter with the city’s Underground Utilities Services says given the local water source, Tallahassee has no reason for lead concern.

Tallahassee Commissioners say they want to address the area’s high rate of violent crimes, but they’re pushing for a more local approach. The conversation comes after the city's gun violence council recommended a Chicago-based violence prevention program to address the crime issues.

Regan McCarthy / WFSU

Renovations at the Tallahassee Animal Service Center mean the agency will be offering limited services Wednesday through Saturday.

Tallahassee already gives organizations holding public events and festivals a break on certain services. But now the city is offering a way for people planning a community event to get more support. Ashley Edwards is the director of the city’s Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Affairs Department. She says applicants can request in-kind city services.

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